Motivational Interviewing

Your Pregnancy Month by Month

Congratulations! You are pregnant. Your health is important. The healthier you are, the healthier your baby will be. All moms want what is best for their babies. This resource will help answer your questions. The more you learn, the more you will be able to make healthy choices. The information in this resource has been […]

Getting Ready for Your Baby

Select a Month Here are the topics you can get information about. Pick one and click on the button. You can click on a new topic at any time. Getting Ready for Your Baby Becoming a Parent Parenting begins long before you have your child. Click here for more information For most people, the idea […]

Month 9 (35 – 39 weeks)

Select a Month Here are the topics you can get information about. Pick one and click on the button. You can click on a new topic at any time. Month 9 Alcohol Use Alcohol can hurt your baby. It can affect the way your baby grows. Not drinking alcohol helps your baby grow. Click here […]

Month 8 (31 – 34 weeks)

Select a Month Here are the topics you can get information about. Pick one and click on the button. You can click on a new topic at any time. Month 8 Alcohol Use Are you going to breastfeed? You can ask your healthcare providers about drinking alcohol and breastfeeding. Click here for more information Drinking […]

Month 7 (27 – 30 weeks)

Select a Month Here are the topics you can get information about. Pick one and click on the button. You can click on a new topic at any time. Month 7 Alcohol Use Alcohol can hurt your baby. Drinking alcohol during pregnancy can cause FASD (Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder). Click here for more information Drinking […]

Month 6 (22 – 26 weeks)

Select a Month Here are the topics you can get information about. Pick one and click on the button. You can click on a new topic at any time. Month 6 Alcohol Use Alcohol can hurt your baby. Spend time with friends who support your decision not to drink. Click here for more information Drinking […]

Month 5 (18 – 21 weeks)

Select a Month Here are the topics you can get information about. Pick one and click on the button. You can click on a new topic at any time. Month 5 Alcohol Use Alcohol can hurt your baby. There is no safe time during pregnancy to drink alcohol. There is no safe amount or type […]

Month 4 (14 – 17 weeks)

Select a Month Here are the topics you can get information about. Pick one and click on the button. You can click on a new topic at any time. Month 4 Alcohol Use Alcohol can hurt your baby’s brain. Your baby’s brain grows and changes the whole time you are pregnant. Protect him and his […]

Month 3 (10 – 13 weeks)

Select a Month Here are the topics you can get information about. Pick one and click on the button. You can click on a new topic at any time. Month 3 Alcohol Use Alcohol can hurt your baby. When you drink alcohol, it goes into your baby’s body. Alcohol includes beer, wine, and spirits. It […]

Month 2 (5 – 9 weeks)

Select a Month Here are the topics you can get information about. Pick one and click on the button. You can click on a new topic at any time. Month 2 Alcohol Use Drinking alcohol when you are pregnant can hurt your baby. Your baby’s liver is small. It cannot deal with alcohol. Get help […]

Month 1 (1 – 4 weeks)

Select a Month Here are the topics you can get information about. Pick one and click on the button. You can click on a new topic at any time. Month 1 Alcohol Use Alcohol can hurt your baby. When you drink alcohol, it goes into your baby’s body. Alcohol includes beer, wine, and spirits. It […]

Low-Risk Alcohol Drinking Guidelines

Canada’s Low-Risk Alcohol Drinking Guidelines (LRDG) help Canadians moderate their alcohol consumption and reduce their immediate and long-term alcohol-related harms.

The Guidelines recommend no more than two drinks a day, 10 per week for women, and three drinks a day, 15 per week for men, with an extra drink allowed on special occasions.

Youth Action for Prevention (YAP)

Youth Action for Prevention

The Saskatchewan Prevention Institute works towards preventing Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) in a number of ways. One of the approaches is through the Youth Action for Prevention (YAP) Program. YAP is a youth-focused FASD prevention initiative that encourages young people to create resources and projects that raise awareness of FASD and other alcohol-related harms among their peers. Saskatchewan youth (between the ages of 14-24) develop projects and/or resources to share with their community.

The Effects of Alcohol

The Effects of Alcohol

Drinking alcohol can harm physical and mental development, particularly in adolescence and early adulthood. It is recommended that youth delay drinking alcohol for as long as possible, at least until the legal drinking age.

Binge Drinking

Binge Drinking

Binge drinking is excessive alcohol consumption or a pattern of drinking that brings the blood alcohol level concentration (BAC) to 0.08 or above. For the typical male adult, this would mean having five or more drinks*, or four or more for females, in about a two-hour period.

Breastfeeding

Breastfeeding

Certain medications, as well as alcohol and most illicit drugs, can be passed to the baby through breast milk. If a woman is taking medication, she should discuss her intake with her healthcare professional. Drugs and alcohol should be avoided throughout pregnancy and lactation.

Alcohol

Alcohol and Pregnancy

The developing baby is connected to the mother by an umbilical cord to the placenta. There is a protective membrane (thin layer of tissue) between the umbilical cord and the placenta that prevents the mixing of their blood. This common blood supply is in place (at about 7-10 days). Anything that goes into the mother’s bloodstream will be passed on to the fetus through a large vein in the umbilical cord.

How to Help

Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder

Often there are no obvious physical signs of the brain damage caused by alcohol. The effects of the damage to the brain can be seen through things such as behaviour and learning difficulties. This is why FASD is often called an invisible disability, and makes it different from many other disabilities. For example, a person who is unable to walk may use a wheelchair. A person who is hearing impaired may use a hearing aid. Someone who is visually impaired may use a cane or service animal.