*Prevention Matters Conference is nut-free and scent-free.

THEME 1:

Role of Prevention in Health

Working upstream to benefit the health and well-being of children

THEME 2:

Knowledge Exchange for Healthy Families and Communities

Sharing knowledge in multiple directions and ways

Community-based professionals, service providers, and healthcare providers who work with children, families, and communities

Connecting and Collaborating to:

Identify and strengthen attendees’ role in prevention to achieve the best health possible for children in Saskatchewan

Highlight ways Saskatchewan healthcare and service providers are currently participating in knowledge exchange

Identify future opportunities for attendees to apply and benefit from knowledge exchange in their work

PURPOSE: Prevention Matters 2019 will focus on building connections and collaborations across disciplines and across the province, to learn from one another to address healthy child development and well-being. The conference will highlight the role of prevention in health and how knowledge exchange (sharing knowledge in multiple directions and ways) is the foundation to addressing needs and improving health.

THEME 1:

Role of Prevention in Health

Prevention Matters aims to help healthcare and service providers identify and strengthen their role in prevention to achieve the best health possible for children in Saskatchewan.

THEME 2:

Knowledge Exchange for Healthy Families and Communities

Prevention Matters aims to highlight ways Saskatchewan healthcare and service providers are currently participating in knowledge exchange and to help attendees identify future opportunities to apply and benefit from knowledge exchange in their work.

The conference will benefit community-based professionals, service providers, and healthcare providers who work with children, families, and communities. This includes Support Workers, Home Visitors, Maternal Child Health Workers, Parent Mentors, Social Workers, Educators, Early Childcare Workers, Mental Health and Addictions Counselors, Youth Workers, Adult Allies, Nurses (Public Health, Primary Care, and Practitioner), Midwives, Family Physicians, Pediatricians, Obstetricians, Medical Health Officers, and others.

  • Medical Stream

A one-day medical stream within Prevention Matters 2019 aims to address the needs of healthcare professionals, with applicable information, training, and tools to use in their practice. The medical stream will be on October 3, 2019. This stream and all of its sessions will be open to all conference attendees.

Registration

The deadline to register for Prevention Matters 2019 is September 24, 2019.

  • April 1 – June 30, 2019
  • $400
  • Early Bird Registration
  • July 1 – Sept. 24, 2019
  • $425
  • Regular Registration
  • Ends Sept. 24, 2019
  • $225
  • One Day Medical Stream

Student pricing is available. Please call 306-651-4300 for more information.

Speakers

  • Everyone
  • Concurrent Speakers
  • Keynote Speakers
  • Gina Alexander
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 3:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    A Community Safety and Well-Being Framework for Saskatchewan


    Gina Alexander is the Executive Director of Community Safety and Well-Being, Integrated Justice Services, serving both the Ministries of Justice and Attorney General and Corrections and Policing. Her responsibilities cover province-wide programs and initiatives including Victims Services, Restorative Justice Programs, Interpersonal Violence and Abuse, Hub Tables, and the Northern Alcohol Strategy. Prior to this current assignment, she was the Executive Assistant to the Deputy Minister to the Premier of Saskatchewan where she was responsible for the co-ordination and implementation of various meetings, committees, and government-wide initiatives. Between 2007 and 2015, Gina was responsible for the delivery of province-wide programs including court annexed civil and family mediation, fee for service mediation, facilitation, and training. Gina’s extensive mediation and facilitation experience includes high conflict family mediation, civil mediation, and organizational and multi-party facilitation. She has provided mediation, conflict resolution, and leadership training to thousands of participants.

  • Jill Bally
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 3:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Seeking to Improve Outcomes for Adolescents of Diverse Ethnicities Living with Undiagnosed Prediabetes and Type 2 Diabetes in Saskatchewan


    Jill Bally, RN, PhD is a registered nurse and has practiced in pediatrics for the past 22 years. Dr. Bally is an Associate Professor in the College of Nursing, University of Saskatchewan. Her doctoral studies focused on pediatric oncology and family-centered nursing care. Currently, Jill continues to develop her program of research related to the health and wellness of children and families who are affected by childhood illnesses.

  • Donna Banach
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 8:45 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Promoting Youth Engagement: Techniques, Goals, and Challenges


    Maria Soonias Ali and Donna Banach are both YAP Coordinators at the Saskatchewan Prevention Institute. As part of the Institute’s FASD team, they support the work of the overall FASD Prevention Program. In addition, both Maria and Donna travel to communities throughout Saskatchewan to provide presentations to youth and adult allies in order to increase honest and safe conversations about alcohol-related harms. The YAP Program, in collaboration with the Institute’s Sexual and Reproductive Health Program, administers Youth Health Community Grants to support youth to raise awareness about sexual health, alcohol-related harms, and harm reduction in their community. The program also develops resources for both services providers and youth; most recently these have included the two facilitator manuals discussed during this training. In 2018, Donna was hired as the Northern Youth Action for Prevention Coordinator at the Saskatchewan Prevention Institute. Based in La Ronge, this position is uniquely positioned in the office of Integrated Justice Services Community Safety and Well-Being and allows for expansion of the YAP Program in Northern Saskatchewan.

  • Erin Beckwell
    (Keynote Session)
    Oct. 2, 2019 | 3:00 –p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

    Knowledge Exchange for Healthy Families & Communities - An Interactive Event


    (Medical Stream Session)
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 8:45 a.m. – 9:45 a.m.

    Mobilizing Knowledge for More Accessible and Effective Patient Care


    (Concurrent Session)
    Oct. 4, 2019 | 8:30 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.

    Use It or Lose It: Mobilizing Knowledge to Improve Health


    Erin is a social worker who has spent her career working in the areas of health, education, and community development. In her current role as Knowledge Translation Specialist with the Saskatchewan Health Authority, Erin’s work focuses on mobilizing knowledge to support the health system to achieve health equity and provide culturally safe care for all.

    Originally from Treaty 4 Territory in Southwest Saskatchewan, she has called Treaty 6 Territory & Homeland of the Métis (Saskatoon, SK) home for over 20 years.

  • Angela Bowen
    Oct. 2, 2019 | 1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Engaging Community and Families to Promote Culturally Safe Care for Indigenous Mothers in Saskatchewan


    Angela Bowen is a Registered Nurse, trained midwife, with a PhD in Community Health and Epidemiology, with a focus on socially vulnerable, including Aboriginal, mothers. She has extensive clinical, educator, and administrator experience in Obstetrics and Mental Health and is a trained midwife. Her research focus, Maternal Mental Health, brings these areas together.

  • Audrey Boyer
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 8:45 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Standardizing Prenatal Education


    Audrey Boyer has been practicing as a Public Health Nutritionist in northern Saskatchewan for 14 years. She came to La Ronge to join the Population Health Unit after completing her undergraduate degree at the University of Manitoba and internship in Winnipeg, The Pas, and Flin Flon. Audrey has a passion for healthy prenatal and early childhood development, healthy public policies, changing environments to promote healthy choices and empowering people to make their own choices. She chairs the Healthy Eating Team of the Northern Healthy Communities Partnership, has taught the first year nutrition course to northern pre-professional students through the University of Regina, and is involved in various groups that strive to promote health in the north and across Saskatchewan. Audrey is president of the Skating Club and teaches community fitness classes in La Ronge. She is lucky to live near the lake and gets to enjoy kayaking, boating, walking in the bush and on winter trails with dogs, cross country skiing, and visiting at her friend Janet’s cabin, all with her husband and their three fun loving kids.

  • Dr. Mahli Brindamour
    (Keynote Panel)
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 1:45 p.m. – 2:45 p.m.

    Food Insecurity: Multiple Perspectives to Understand the Issue


    Mahli Brindamour provides care to mothers and infants cared for at Sanctum 1.5 prenatal and postnatal home for women at risk of HIV exposure in pregnancy, HIV positive, or at risk of child apprehension. Sanctum 1.5 is leading innovative practice by ensuring trauma informed care for women before their infants are born and then continuity of mother-infant care after delivery. Infants are discharged from the hospital in the care of their mothers with supervision from staff. Sanctum 1.5 also provides monitoring for neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) and is piloting the assessment and treatment of NAS in a community setting with pediatric oversight, which is a novel approach not yet developed elsewhere.

  • Carol Bullin
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 3:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Seeking to Improve Outcomes for Adolescents of Diverse Ethnicities Living with Undiagnosed Prediabetes and Type 2 Diabetes in Saskatchewan


    Carol Bullin, RN, PhD is a registered nurse for over 35 years and has practiced in a variety of clinical settings including critical care, operating room, and kidney disease/peritoneal dialysis. Dr. Bullin is an Assistant Professor in the College of Nursing at the University of Saskatchewan. Dr. Bullin’s program of research focuses on chronic kidney disease self-management and health promotion of Indigenous peoples in rural and remote populations.

  • John Carriere
    Oct. 4, 2019 | 8:30 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Building Research Relationships with Indigenous Communities


    John Carriere is from Cumberland House SK, where he grew up around hunting, fishing, and trapping. His parents are members of the Peter Ballantyne Cree Nation and the Nisichawayasihk Cree Nation. He has a Bachelor of Arts in Indigenous Studies from the University of Saskatchewan through NORPAC. John volunteered and worked in sports, recreation, and culture roles with different organizations while living in La Ronge, SK. He also has experience working within the Government of Saskatchewan with roles in the Ministry of Justice and the Ministry of Environment. Bringing a patient perspective to the team, John is also a Factor IX Hemophiliac and over the years has volunteered and been involved with Hemophilia Saskatchewan and the Canadian Hemophilia Society. By managing the disorder, he is able to enjoy playing basketball, weight training, and running

  • Barbara Compton
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 8:45 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    The Community Safety Education Strategy: Sustaining a Path to Cultural Transformation


    Barbara Compton, recently superannuated from a successful 36-year career in public education where she was a teacher, vice principal, principal, and Superintendent. She has been involved in education at the provincial and local levels serving on numerous committees to address the needs of Saskatchewan schools. Barbara presently works with Safe Saskatchewan as the Community Safety Education Strategy (CSES) Coordinator. Her role is to inform, involve, and engage provincial partners to actualize the CSES in Saskatchewan school divisions.

  • Liza Dahl
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 8:45 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    TTYL: Helping Youth Put the WE in Wellness


    Liza Dahl is an Addictions Educator for the Sun West School Division. She was born and raised in Davidson. Liza pursued education at the University of Lethbridge, obtaining a Bachelor in Health Science Counselling. Liza has worked with the Sun West School Division as the Addictions Educator since 2006. She has developed and offered a variety of prevention programs throughout the Division. These programs cover a variety of topics, mental health, addictions, risk-taking behaviour, health choices, brain development, and many more. Liza is living in Davidson with her husband, raising their three children. When she is not working with the school kids, Liza is very involved in coaching, mentoring, church, and cheering her own kids on.

  • Cheyanne Desnomie
    Oct. 4, 2019 | 8:30 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Building Research Relationships with Indigenous Communities


    Cheyanne Desnomie is a Plains Cree woman from Peepeekisis Cree Nation in the Treaty 4 territory of southern Saskatchewan. She holds a Bachelor of Arts Honours degree in Anthropology, and a Master of Arts in History from the University of Regina (U of R). Cheyanne’s research background focuses on oral history, social memory, identity, and the lasting influence of colonial policies on Indigenous people.

    Prior to joining the team at IPHRC, Cheyanne held a variety of roles at the U of R. Notably, she was the Manager of the Aboriginal Student Centre in addition to being the Student Success Facilitator for the nitôncipâmin omâ (OMA) Student Success Program, a retention and transition program for first-year Indigenous students at the U of R, First Nations University of Canada, Luther College and Campion College. Cheyanne is also a sessional instructor for the Department of Anthropology at the U of R. In her spare time, she enjoys crafting and creating everything from beadwork to knitting to building paper mache sculptures.

  • Bev Drew
    Oct. 4, 2019 | 8:30 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Supporting young children with FASD in Aboriginal Head Start Centres: Teachings from the Canadian FASD Mentoring Project


    Bev works in FASD prevention at the Saskatchewan Prevention Institute. She has a Bachelor of Applied Science in Child Development, a Master of Science in Human Development and Family Studies, and is a member of the Motivational Interviewing Network of Trainers (MINT). Her work at the Prevention Institute includes providing education, training, and resources related to FASD, prenatal development, alcohol, and Motivational Interviewing. She is also the lead for The Canadian FASD Mentoring Project funded by the Public Health Agency of Canada. This is a national project to offer FASD workshops to 134 Aboriginal Head Start programs in Urban and Northern Communities (AHSUNC) across Canada. Bev provides resources, expertise, and leadership to FASD Mentors and supports them to provide evidence-based FASD workshops tailored to each AHSUNC community.

  • Dr. Jeff Eichhorst
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 3:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Saskatchewan Prenatal Screening for Aneuploidy and Open Neural Tube Defects


    Dr. Jeff Eichhorst holds a Certificate in Laboratory Technology and Bachelor’s Degree in Biochemistry from the University of Regina and a PhD in Pathology and Laboratory Medicine from the University of Saskatchewan. He has over 35 years’ experience in clinical analytical laboratory testing.

    His main area of research and interest has been in both clinical and forensic toxicology as well as clinical analyses using tandem mass spectrometry. He helped develop and implement expanded newborn screening testing in Saskatchewan and has worked in developing other provincial screening programs such as maternal serum screening and colorectal cancer screening. He has many peer reviewed publications, invited presentations and abstract presentations at both national and international conferences in the USA and Europe. He has trained and mentored many undergraduate and graduate students as part of their laboratory training. He currently serves as a clinical biochemist for the Saskatchewan Health Authority at the Roy Romanow Provincial Laboratory in Regina, SK.

  • Dr. Marta Erlandson
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 3:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Physical literacy enriched communities: Baseline results of a home, school, and community approach to improving physical literacy


    Dr. Marta Erlandson is an Assistant Professor in the College of Kinesiology at the University of Saskatchewan. Her research program covers growth and development and musculoskeletal health across the life span. Dr. Erlandson is funded by the Saskatchewan Health Research Foundation and is a national expert on the influence of physical activity on musculoskeletal development and the effect of physical activity on children’s growth and maturation. She is seasoned in the implementation of physical activity interventions for both healthy and clinical populations.

  • Dr. Amanda Froehlich Chow
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 3:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Healthy Start/Départ Santé for Families (HSFF): A Collaborative, Multi-stakeholders Initiative to Support Families in Making Healthy Changes


    Dr. Amanda Froehlich Chow is a Métis postdoctoral researcher in the Canadian Centre for Health and Safety in Agriculture (CCHSA). She has a background in kinesiology, health promotion interventions, and public and population health studies. Her research focuses on primary health care and preventative interventions to promote the health of community, particularly among more vulnerable populations (Indigenous peoples, young children, and older adults). She has extensive experience collaborating with rural populations to develop, implement, and evaluate community-based health promotion interventions and she is a co-investigator on a number of grants funding research aimed at applying a community participatory approach to investigate the health needs of community. Dr. Froehlich Chow is passionate about collaborating with communities during each phase of the research process; as such she has expertise in employing mixed methods to evaluate program impact in a way that is meaningful for community partners.

  • Dr. Kali Gartner
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 8:45 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Caring for Women* Who Use Substances in Pregnancy and Their Infants: Recognizing the Structural and Socioeconomic Factors That Impact Women* and Families and Interventions to Improve Mother-Infant Outcomes

    *We recognize that not all people who are pregnant identify as women and the importance of using the preferred pronouns of our clients

    Kali Gartner is a family physician living in Saskatoon, SK, Treaty 6 Territory and the Homeland of the Metis Nation. She attended the U of S College of Medicine then moved to Vancouver, BC for Family Medicine Residency and Enhanced Skills Training in HIV/AIDS and Addiction Medicine. Dr. Gartner worked for two years with Sheway and FIR Square Unit at BC Women’s Hospital providing primary care, prenatal care, and follow-up with a pregnancy outreach program caring for women in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside impacted by trauma, violence, and substance use. She also worked with the Maxxine Wright Health Centre which is a similar program in Surrey, BC. She is now thankful to be back home working with the Saskatoon Community Clinic and Westside Community Clinic. Families accessing care at Westside Community Clinic are disproportionately impacted by effects of colonization, intergenerational trauma, and poverty. Integrated prenatal, medical, obstetrical, mental health, and addiction care is provided at the Westside Community Clinic in partnership with community organizations, Saskatchewan Health Authority, visiting medical specialists, and a holistic interdisciplinary team.

  • Brooke Graham
    Oct. 2, 2019 | 1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    The Role of Doulas in Healthcare


    Brooke Graham is the Prenatal Outreach Coordinator for the non-profit organization, KidsFirst North. She completed training as a labour doula with DONA International in 2010 and is a certified childbirth educator through Douglas College. Brooke is involved with several initiatives that promote prenatal education and support for women and families in northern Saskatchewan.

  • Dr. Holly Graham
    Oct. 2, 2019 | 1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Engaging Community and Families to Promote Culturally Safe Care for Indigenous Mothers in Saskatchewan


    Dr. Holly Graham is a member of the Thunderchild First Nation. She has worked as a Registered Nurse (RN) in a variety of northern communities, in addition to various other healthcare environments since 1985. Holly is an Assistant Professor in the College of Nursing, at the University of Saskatchewan. She maintains an active practice as a Registered Doctoral Psychologist, working primarily with individuals who have experienced trauma and symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Holly’s research is focused on Indigenous health, mental health, and well-being.

  • Moses Gordon
    Oct. 4, 2019 | 8:30 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Building Research Relationships with Indigenous Communities


    Moses Gordon is from the George Gordon First Nation. He holds a Master's of Public Policy, a Bachelor of Arts in History, and a Certificate in Economics from the University of Regina. Moses is currently a specialist on the Indigenous Research and Engagement Platform with SCPOR. Prior to working at IPHRC, Moses spent over three years working in research at the First Nations University of Canada. In addition to his professional roles, he also serves on the board of directors for George Gordon Developments Ltd., the economic development arm of the George Gordon First Nation, as well as the Indigenous Advisory Circle at the University of Regina.

    As the Indigenous Research and Engagement Platform Specialist housed out of IPHRC's Regina location, Moses is responsible for supporting relationships between health researchers and Indigenous communities in the southern half of the province. Promoting the wellbeing of First Nation communities has consistently remained the underlying passion that drives his career. While his foray into health research is a recent one, he arrived from a multidisciplinary background in research on Indigenous nation rebuilding in respect to business development and governance reform. An avid bookworm, Moses strongly believes that the pen is mightier than the sword.

  • Jhalene Groth
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 8:45 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    TTYL: Helping Youth Put the WE in Wellness


    Jhalene Groth is the Addictions Counsellor with Saskatchewan Health Authority that is based out of Unity and covers the surrounding communities of Kerrobert and Macklin. Jhalene has been working in this position for the past 13 years and previously worked in the Swift Current office for four years in the same position. Jhalene works with both youth and adults and enjoys the prevention focus when working with youth. Jhalene has been involved in various community groups in her career that have worked to provide numerous services within each community. In her spare time, she is busy with her two young children and their activities.

  • Dr. Jasmine Hasselback
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 8:45 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Improving the Child Health Clinic Experience


    Dr. Jasmine Hasselback is a Public Health Physician and Medical Health Officer for the Saskatchewan Health Authority in Saskatoon. Her work is focused on preventing chronic disease and injury, and in promoting health and well-being. Part of that work includes intervening early in life and working to prevent adverse childhood experiences and helping to build child resiliency. Her work often includes partnerships with many non-healthcare related programs, services, and organizations because she knows that although her job is to keep people from getting sick, the healthcare system holds very few of the levers to make that happen.

  • Veronica Hawley
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 8:45 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Baby's Best Start Prenatal Program


    Veronica Hawley is a Public Health Nurse working for the Saskatchewan Health Authority in Moose Jaw and is one of the facilitators of the Babies Best Start Prenatal Program. Veronica is a graduate of the University of Saskatchewan Nursing Education Program and has worked in the area of Public Health Nursing for the past 15 years. She has had the opportunity to work for Public Health in Northern British Columbia and in both rural and urban settings in the province of Saskatchewan. Her role as a public health nurse has varied over the years, but she has always had a passion for family health and enjoys working with young mothers and at-risk families. Veronica loves spending all of her extra time with her husband, family, friends, and with her two school-aged children, Logan and Olivia.

  • Connie Herman
    Oct. 4, 2019 | 8:30 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Knowledge Exchange in Action Through Facilitation


    As the Provincial Coordinator for the Nobody's Perfect Parent Program, Connie is passionate about supporting parents, families, and communities. Based out of the Saskatchewan Prevention Institute, Connie provides training, resource development, and support to service providers who work with parents and families. She has a BA with majors in psychology and sociology, and Bachelors of Social Work. As a Parent Program Coordinator, Parent Coach, and a mom to a 4-year-old girl and 10-year-old boy, Connie recognizes that parenting is one of the most rewarding, most important, and also the most challenging job there is.

  • Erin Hewitt
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 8:45 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Baby's Best Start Prenatal Program


    Erin Hewitt is a Public Health Nurse working for the Saskatchewan Health Authority in Moose Jaw and is one of the facilitators of the Babies Best Start Prenatal Program. Erin is a graduate of the University of Saskatchewan Nursing Education Program and has been nursing for over 15 years. Her nursing career began in acute care, working in the field of pediatrics and infection control. She was given the opportunity to work in Public Health Nursing and has found this to be her passion. She is a caring and empathetic nurse who feels that holistic and family-centered care is the best way to provide optimal care for her clients. Erin is a busy wife and mom of two children. In her spare time, she likes to read and walk her two energetic dogs.

  • Lee Hinton
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 3:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Increasing our Capacity to Support the Healthy Development of Young Children in Saskatchewan Zero to Three Fellowship


    Lee Hinton has been the Program Manager at the Saskatchewan Prevention Institute since 2007. Lee’s career has focused on children’s, women’s, and family health and well-being. Lee obtained her undergraduate degree from the University of Waterloo, holds a Post Graduate Degree in Art Therapy from the University of Western Ontario, and a Masters of Social Work from Wilfred Laurier University. She is a current Fellow with the Zero to Three Fellowship Class 2018-2020. Lee has expertise in the development and implementation of primary prevention approaches that increase the probability that Saskatchewan children are given opportunities to develop a strong foundation for later health and development. To this end, Lee works extensively with communities throughout Saskatchewan and participates on national and provincial projects and advisory committees to develop a common knowledge-base and increase agreement regarding the importance of the early years. She provides support and leadership, ensuring that programs and projects meet their goals in an efficient, research-based, high quality, and effective manner. Lee developed and coordinates the Early Childhood Mental Health Program, which focuses on bringing emerging, evidence-based information and training to professionals throughout the province.

  • Natalie Houser
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 3:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Physical literacy enriched communities: Baseline results of a home, school, and community approach to improving physical literacy


    Natalie Houser is a PhD Candidate in the College of Kinesiology at the University of Saskatchewan. Natalie is a community-based researcher with her research currently focused on the development of physical literacy in school-aged children through multi-environmental approaches. Her PhD research is also exploring how aspects of children’s’ growth and maturation influences their physical literacy.

  • Dr. Louise Humbert
    (Concurrent Sessions)

    Oct. 3, 2019 | 3:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Healthy Start/Départ Santé for Families (HSFF): A Collaborative, Multi-stakeholders Initiative to Support Families in Making Healthy Changes


    Oct. 3, 2019 | 3:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Physical literacy enriched communities: Baseline results of a home, school, and community approach to improving physical literacy


    Dr. Louise Humbert is a professor in the College of Kinesiology at the University of Saskatchewan. She is a community-based researcher with over 20 years’ experience working in community settings. A founding member of Saskatoon and Saskatchewan in motion, Louise has experience listening to the needs of community members and working with them to develop initiatives that reflect their needs and realities. She is currently involved in two large projects assessing the impact of interventions on the development of physical literacy in school-aged children. Louise is also very interested in the thoughts and experiences of parents and educators and she works to ensure their voices are heard in all aspects of program development, implementation, and evaluation. Louise is currently the Chair of the Board of Directors of Active Saskatchewan.

  • Dr. Mark Inman
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 3:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Primary and Secondary Prevention Strategies in Pediatric Type 2 Diabetes


    Dr. Mark Inman is a Pediatric Endocrinologist affiliated with the University of Saskatchewan College of Medicine and works with the LiveWell Pediatric Diabetes Program at Royal University Hospital in Saskatoon. His clinical work involves both type 1 and type 2 diabetes as well as an array of pediatric endocrine disorders.

  • Dr. James Irvine
    Oct. 2, 2019 | 1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Changing the Story About Alcohol


    Dr. James Irvine, is a public health and preventive medicine physician, a Professor Emeritus with the University of Saskatchewan’s College of Medicine, and has been the Medical Health Officer for the northern half of the province since 1985. He lives in LaRonge where he has been involved with public health, health care, administration, teaching, and research. His main public health and research interests involve environmental health, communicable disease control, health promotion, children’s health and Indigenous health. James has been a member of the Medical Advisory Committee of the Prevention Institute since 2001 and the chair since 2014. James has been supporting the Northern Alcohol Strategy since its inception.

  • Joan Johnson
    Oct. 2, 2019 | 1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Changing the Story About Alcohol


    Joan Johnson is a traditional Indigenous woman who lives with her husband, Harold, on the north end of Montreal Lake. Joan has had a lengthy career in justice and community development that has included work with Correctional Services of Canada, development of Restorative Justice approaches in Aboriginal communities, work with the Ontario Federation of Indigenous Friendship Centres, and the role of a complex case needs Probation Officer in northern Saskatchewan. She was recognized for her experience and expertise, seconded to work on the alcohol strategy in January of 2016, and is now employed with Community Safety and Well-being branch for the province.

  • Dawn Kellington
    Oct. 2, 2019 | 1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Hear our Voices: A Conversation about Youth, Mental Health, & Creative Expression


    Dawn Kellington is the coordinator of the Survivor 101 program offered through CFS Saskatoon. The Survivor 101 program offers in-school support groups for youth experiencing mental health challenges and or violence as well as community engagement projects featuring youth voice. Dawn has edited two publications featuring the stories of youth; Day by Day: A Handbook for Teens and Hand in Hand: A Guidebook for Adults. In these publications, through written and visual art, youth share their experiences of mental health and/or violence and use their stories to encourage, influence, and impact other youth, health professionals, and community leaders. The Survivor 101 program aims to create safe spaces in which youth can learn, connect, and be empowered. Two youth advocates who contributed to the publications will be co-presenting.

  • Dr. Alexandra King
    Oct. 2, 2019 | 1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Indigenous Wellness as Prevention


    Dr. Alexandra King, MD, FRCPC, is a citizen of the Nipissing First Nation (Ontario).

    Alexandra is the inaugural Cameco Chair in Indigenous Health at the University of Saskatchewan. She works with Indigenous communities and relevant stakeholders to understand the health and wellness needs of First Nations and Métis peoples in Saskatchewan and the structural changes needed for improved Indigenous health outcomes. Alexandra brings leadership skills in culturally safe and responsive research and care, Two-eyed Seeing (bringing together Indigenous and Western worldviews or forms of knowledges) and Ethical Space—which needs to be created when peoples with disparate worldviews are poised to engage each other.

    As a First Nation researcher, Alexandra is a Principal Investigator on various CIHR research grants related to Indigenous people and HIV, HCV, and co-infections. Other research interests include Indigenous wellness and Indigenous research ethics, and much of her research is community-based interventions grounded in Indigenous epistemology, culture, and wellness. Alexandra also teaches Indigenous health and contributes to the University of Saskatchewan’s decolonization, reconciliation, and Indigenization.

  • Ken Lamoureux
    (Keynote Session)
    Oct. 2, 2019 | 10:30 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

    Changing the Conversation: Reframing FASD in Manitoba


    Ken Lamoureux has worked for the Manitoba Government for over 9 years, and has been a Program and Policy Consultant for the past 7 years with Healthy Child Manitoba Office (HCMO). His work at HCMO focuses on FASD intervention and support initiatives for people with FASD (across the lifespan) and their families. Prior to working at HCMO, Ken worked as a special education teacher for Manitoba Justice. He holds a Bachelor of Physical Education (BPE) and a Bachelor or Education (B.Ed) from the University of Manitoba.

  • Sara Langley
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 3:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Canada’s Food Guide-What’s All the Hype About?


    Sara Langley is the Regional Nutritionist with Indigenous Services Canada in Saskatchewan. She works to support First Nations communities and the people that work in the communities in the areas of prenatal, infant, and childhood nutrition, with a focus on food security. Sara lives in Pense with her husband and dog, and spends countless hours in the summers in her garden.

  • Dr. Noni MacDonald
    (Keynote Session)
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 11:00 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.

    Optimizing Vaccine Uptake – Addressing Vaccine Hesitancy


    Noni MacDonald is a Professor of Paediatrics (Infectious Diseases) at Dalhousie University and the IWK Health Centre in Halifax, Nova Scotia. She is a former Dean of Medicine at Dalhousie University and was the first woman in Canada to be a Dean of Medicine. Her two current major areas of interest involve global health. The first is vaccines including vaccine safety, hesitancy, demand, pain mitigation, education and policy, especially through her work with the World Health Organization (WHO). She has been a member of SAGE (the Strategic Advisory Group of Experts on immunization for WHO) since 2017. This committee provides advice to the WHO on all aspects of vaccinology. She also chairs the WHO Decade of Vaccine assessment committee that has been charged with reviewing the progress (or lack thereof) on the Global Vaccine Action Plan (GVAP) goals as a precursor for development of the next Decade of Vaccines plan. The second area is MicroResearch - building capacity in community focused research in developing countries and now also in Canada (www.microresearch-international.ca) to help interdisciplinary health professionals find local solutions for community health problems that fit the context, culture, and resources. She is a Founder and Co-Director of the Centre for MicroResearch International.

    Dr. MacDonald has published over 400 papers; was the founding Editor-in-Chief of Paediatrics & Child Health for over 20 years, and a former Editor-in-Chief of CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). She is the Editor for Child Health for new Oxford University Press publication Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Global Public Health. Dr. MacDonald has long been recognized in Canada and internationally, as an advocate for child and youth health and as a leader in paediatric infectious diseases and global health.

  • Della Magnusson
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 8:45 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Caring for Women* Who Use Substances in Pregnancy and Their Infants: Recognizing the Structural and Socioeconomic Factors That Impact Women* and Families and Interventions to Improve Mother-Infant Outcomes


    Della Magnusson provide primary care and prenatal care to women and their infants at the Westside Community Clinic. Some women who access care at Westside Community Clinic are impacted by effects of colonization, intergenerational trauma, and poverty. Integrated prenatal, medical, obstrical, mental health, and addiction care is provided at the Westside Community Clinic in partnership with community organizations, Saskatchewan Health Authority, visiting medical specialists, and a holistic interdisciplinary team.

    Della Magnusson provide care to mothers and infants cared for at Sanctum 1.5 prenatal and postnatal home or women at risk of HIV exposure in pregnancy, HIV positive or at risk of child apprehension. Sanctum 1.5 is leading innovative practice by ensuring trauma informed care for women before their infants is born and then continuity of mother-infant care after delivery. Infants are discharged from the hospital in the care of their mothers with supervision from staff. Sanctum 1.5 also provides monitoring for neonatal abstinence syndrome and is piloting assessment and treatment of NAS in a community setting with pediatric oversight which is a novel approach not yet developed elsewhere.

  • Natalya Mason
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 3:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Tell It Like It Is: Engaging and Innovative Comprehensive Sexuality Education for People with Developmental Disabilities, and Those Who Support Them


    Natalya Mason is a sexual health educator and a social worker who was born and raised in Saskatoon. She holds a B.A. in Psychology from the University of Saskatchewan, a BSW from the University of Regina, and a Post-Graduate Certificate in Sexual Health from the University of Alberta. She is currently completing a M.A. in Women’s, Gender, and Sexualities Studies at the U of S, where her graduate work focuses on social and emotional barriers to condom use for adolescent girls. Natalya has been the Education/Outreach Coordinator at Saskatoon Sexual Health for five years. In that time, she has taught in communities across the province, been involved in numerous projects nationally, and amassed a collection of twelve wooden penises. She is a big believer in community, and as such is proud to be a lifelong member of the Girl Guides of Canada, and to sit on the Board of Directors with OUTSaskatoon.

  • Erick McNair
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 3:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Seeking to Improve Outcomes for Adolescents of Diverse Ethnicities Living with Undiagnosed Prediabetes and Type 2 Diabetes in Saskatchewan


    Erick McNair, PhD is a faculty member of the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine and an Associate Member of the Department of Surgery, Division of Cardiac Surgery. Dr. McNair’s background is in cardiac pathology and clinical perfusion during cardiac surgery. He is involved in teaching, research, and scholarly activities. Dr. McNair’s research focus is on the identification of biochemical markers of organ injury (heart, kidney, and brain), prevention of diabetes in youth, and platelet function testing.

  • Cassie McVay
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 3:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Canada’s Food Guide-What’s All the Hype About?


    Cassie McVay a Community Dietitian with the Meadow Lake Tribal Council. Cassie is from New Brunswick and has lived in Saskatchewan for five years. Cassie supports 9 First Nation communities in all things nutrition! She spends most of spare her time at home on her acreage with her fiancé, three dogs, two alpacas, two donkeys, two goats (soon to be three!), and her flock of unique chickens! When she isn’t tending to her animals she is sewing, painting, gardening, and spending time on the land.

  • Dr. Maryam Mehtar
    Oct. 2, 2019 | 1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Paediatric School-Based – Health: A community based alternate moldel of care


    Dr. Mehtar is currently an assistant professor in the Department of Paediatrics, at the University of Saskatchewan. She is the section head for the Division of Social Paediatrics/ Paediatric School-based Health in Saskatoon. She is also the Program Director for the Paediatric Residency Program at the University of Saskatchewan. She completed her medical school degree in 1989 at the University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg, South Africa. She completed her Paediatric Residency at the University of Saskatchewan in 1999.

  • Dr. Melissa Mirosh
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 3:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Contraception for Adolescents


    Dr. Melissa Mirosh graduated medical school from Queen’s University in 2000, followed by her Obstetrics and Gynecology Residency at the U of S that finished in 2005. She returned to Queen’s to complete the CARE (Contraception Advice, Research, and Education) Fellowship in 2006. After working in private practice in Southern Alberta, Dr. Mirosh joined the Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Sciences in 2010. Her work interests include contraception, teen pregnancy, and medical education. She is a proud mom of three, including four-year-old twins who keep her very busy and entertained.

  • Gord Moker
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 8:45 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    The Community Safety Education Strategy: Sustaining a Path to Cultural Transformation


    Gord Moker, Chief Executive Officer of Safe Saskatchewan, was born and raised in Wakaw, Saskatchewan, and demonstrates daily passion and commitment to moving the vision of an injury-free Saskatchewan forward. Gord is extremely familiar with the injury prevention world, having worked for the Saskatchewan Workers’ Compensation Board (WCB) for 15 years. Today, Gord continues to aid in the steady forward movement of Mission: Zero, towards transforming our provincial culture and positioning injury prevention as a core value.

  • Jessica Moyer
    (Keynote Session)
    Oct. 2, 2019 | 10:30 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

    Framing to Enhance Public Understanding: Strategies for Communicating About Healthy Childhood Development


    Jessica Moyer is a sociologist and geographer, and an associate in the Research Interpretation and Application unit at the FrameWorks Institute. In her role, she helps advocates on a range of progressive social issues engage the public in more productive conversations – ones that build public understanding and drive positive change.

    Prior to joining FrameWorks, Jessica worked with several social and environmental organizations, including The Mighty Creatives, where she helped disadvantaged young adults transition from school into meaningful employment; The Race Equality Centre, where she provided research and advocacy support to black, minority ethnic, and immigrant communities; and the Center for Marine Resource Studies in the Turks and Caicos Islands, where she coordinated conservation, education, and community-building initiatives. Jessica has also taught at universities in the United States and the United Kingdom.

  • Dr. Marcella Ogenchuk
    Oct. 2, 2019 | 1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Exploring Pediatric Oral Health in and With One Indigenous Community


    Dr. Marcella Ogenchuk is a registered nurse and faculty member in the University of Saskatchewan’s College of Nursing. Dr. Ogenchuk has extensive pediatric nursing experience in acute and community settings and as a nurse leader in oral health in children. Dr. Ogenchuk brings her expertise in developing pathways of care for elementary students requiring urgent oral health care in an urban center using a multidisciplinary approach and facilitating school oral health preventative strategies.

  • Anita Ogurlu
    Oct. 4, 2019 | 8:30 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Caught Between Two Worlds: Newcomer Youth Overcome Challenges to Embrace Life!


    Anita Ogurlu, Cultural Bridging Facilitator at the Open Door Society has lived abroad for over 25 years. She has worked in multinational corporations as an advertising executive. In 2005, she returned to academia completing a Master’s in Cultural Studies (Turkey, 2007) and PhD in Humanities and Cultural Studies (Birkbeck College, UK 2016). Anita has lectured in media and cultural studies, visual communication, and aesthetics. She has presented at conferences across the globe. Anita is a lecturer at the University of Saskatchewan and St. Thomas More College.

  • Dr. Johnmark Opondo
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 3:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Let’s Talk Syphilis – Mom and Baby


    Dr. Johnmark Opondo is a Medical Health Officer for Saskatchewan Health Authority - Saskatoon, and has several years of experience in public health – from reducing high rates of maternal mortality in three African countries, to a background in reproductive health – as a public health expert. He received his Masters training in Public Health from Atlanta’s Emory University, worked at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Atlanta, following a clinical career in Kenya as a medical doctor, where he also served as a District Medical Health Officer in the city of Mombasa. His portfolio with Population and Public Health includes Communicable Disease Control, Sexual/Street Health, International Travel & Vaccine Management, STI and Positive Living Program/SHR HIV Strategy and Emergency Preparedness.

  • Janice Osecap
    Oct. 2, 2019 | 1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Engaging Community and Families to Promote Culturally Safe Care for Indigenous Mothers in Saskatchewan


    Janice Osecap is a Cree mother from Moosomin First Nation in Saskatchewan. She is currently a student in the Indian Teacher Program (ITEP) in the College of Education and is an active and invaluable member of the Indigenous Birth Network research team. Janice is proud of her cultural upbringing and passionate about helping Indigenous youth access their culture. She is a recipient of the Indigenous Achievement Award as well as a CIHR award to travel to Montreal in June 2019 to present at the Indigenous Gender Wellness Idea Fair and Learning Circle. Janice aims to help create positive Indigenous identities and build individual confidence for Indigenous youth.

  • Dr. Cassie Pancyr
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 8:45 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Caring for Women* Who Use Substances in Pregnancy and Their Infants: Recognizing the Structural and Socioeconomic Factors That Impact Women* and Families and Interventions to Improve Mother-Infant Outcomes

    *We recognize that not all people who are pregnant identify as women and the importance of using the preferred pronouns of our clients

    Dr. Cassie Pancyr provide primary care and prenatal care to women and their infants at the Westside Community Clinic. Some women who access care at Westside Community Clinic are impacted by effects of colonization, intergenerational trauma, and poverty. Integrated prenatal, medical, obstrical, mental health, and addiction care is provided at the Westside Community Clinic in partnership with community organizations, Saskatchewan Health Authority, visiting medical specialists, and a holistic interdisciplinary team.

  • Carrie Pratt
    Oct. 2, 2019 | 1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Engaging Community and Families to Promote Culturally Safe Care for Indigenous Mothers in Saskatchewan


    Carrie Pratt is from Birch Hills, Saskatchewan and is of Cree, Metis, and Settler ancestry. She works as a Registered Nurse in rural homecare while she completes full time studies in the Master of Nursing, Thesis Program at the University of Saskatchewan. She uses participatory action research and patient-oriented research methodologies to understand the lived experiences of Indigenous mothers who have had a baby in a Saskatchewan hospital.

  • Kavitha Ramachandran
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 3:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Healthy Start/Départ Santé for Families (HSFF): A Collaborative, Multi-stakeholders Initiative to Support Families in Making Healthy Changes


    Kavitha Ramachandran is a PhD Candidate in the Department of Community Health and Epidemiology at the University of Saskatchewan, specializing in Community and Population Health Sciences. She joined the Healthy Start research team in September 2013 and works as a Family Engagement Program Coordinator. Kavitha worked as a Nutrition Research Coordinator for the College of Pharmacy and Nutrition prior to her enrolment in the PhD program. Her areas of interest in research include collaborative and community-based participatory research: to promote health and wellness for children and families, Indigenous and under-served communities, newcomers, refugees and diverse populations. She developed family engagement initiative after community consultations which is currently being pilot tested in urban and rural Saskatchewan. It is a home-based/visiting health promotion intervention to encourage healthy eating, physical activity, and positive conversation among young children and families. Kavitha is an internationally trained dietitian and has master’s degrees in Nutrition and Dietetics.

  • Dr. Madhav Sarda
    (Keynote Session)
    Oct. 4, 2019 | 10:30 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

    Childhood Anxiety: Worried About Worrying


    Madhav Sarda is a Child and Adolescent Psychiatrist in Saskatoon. He trained at the University of Saskatchewan and completed medical school at the University of Alberta. His practice involves treating kids of all ages with a wide variety of mental disorders. This includes on the psychiatric inpatient ward, the Pediatric inpatient ward, and in his outpatient clinic. He also works with the University to teach and train residents and medical students. Madhav grew up in Alberta and moved to Saskatoon almost 10 years ago, where he lives now with his wife and two children.

  • Janice Seebach
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 3:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Let’s Talk Syphilis – Mom and Baby


    Janice Seebach has been a Public Health Nurse for Saskatchewan Health Authority - Saskatoon for almost 25 years. She graduated from University of Saskatchewan with Bachelor of Science in Nursing, and has primarily worked at the STI Clinic in Saskatoon. In 2012, Janice took on the Nurse Clinician role to support Sexual and Street Health staff; providing orientation, policy development, and programming as it relates to STBBI and harm reduction services.

  • Dave Shanks
    Oct. 2, 2019 | 1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Youth Who Thrive


    Dave Shanks has been working alongside young people for the past 20 years. By translating academic research into practice (Knowledge into Action), he hopes to help transform the way we intentionally support young people to make a positive transition to adulthood.

  • Tanis Shanks
    Oct. 4, 2019 | 8:30 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Knowledge Exchange in Action Through Facilitation


    Tanis Shanks is the CAPC Training and Education Coordinator for the Saskatchewan Prevention Institute. For over a decade, Tanis has worked with parents and children in numerous capacities, including program development, facilitation, mentorship, childcare, and administration. As a parent herself, Tanis is very passionate about parenting education, healthy child development, violence prevention, and human rights. Tanis also delivers trainings, presentations, and workshops around Saskatchewan on the Nobody’s Perfect Parenting Program, Positive Discipline in Everyday Parenting, Kids Have Stress Too!, and My Curious Brain. Tanis is a member of the Dad Central Canada Conference organizing committee and is the Dad Central Canada Representative for Saskatchewan. Tanis’ educational background includes a Bachelor of Arts (Hon.) majoring in Indigenous Studies from the University of Saskatchewan, Bachelor of Social Work and Master of Social Work, both from the University of Regina.

  • Dr. Seyara Shwetz
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 3:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Saskatchewan’s TREKK Roadshow: A novel approach to dissemination critical PEM resources to rural healthcare practitioners


    Dr. Sey Shwetz is in her fourth year of residency training, pursuing dual certification in Emergency Medicine at the University of Saskatchewan and Pediatric Emergency Medicine at the University of Alberta. Her interests include pre-hospital medicine and maximizing outcomes for pediatric patients in rural and remote areas. She is a keen wellness champion and an active leader in the resident physician community, currently acting as the Board Chair for Resident Doctors of Canada.

  • Dr. Keith Da Silva
    Oct. 2, 2019 | 1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Oral Health, General Health, and Overall Well-being – Why Prevention Matters


    Dr. Keith Da Silva is an assistant professor at the College of Dentistry, University of Saskatchewan; a Fellow of the Royal College of Dentists of Canada; and a dual specialist in pediatric dentistry and dental public health. He currently serves on the Board of Directors at the Canadian Association in Public Health Dentistry. As a clinician, he has worked in private practice, community clinics, and hospital settings. As a researcher, his main focus is improving access to oral health care through community-based interventions and upstream policy solutions.

  • Dr. Stuart Skinner
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 9:45 a.m. – 10:45 a.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    A Combined Response to Address Health Gaps in Indigenous Communities


    Dr. Stuart Skinner received his medical degree from the University of Saskatchewan in 2002. He also holds a Diploma in Tropical Medicine and Hygiene from the Gorgas Institute at the University of Alabama (2002), and a Diploma in Tropical Medicine and Hygiene from the University of Peru (2005). Dr. Skinner is a Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians of Canada (2006), and holds a Certificate of Special Competence in Infectious Diseases (2007). He is an Assistant Professor at the University of Saskatchewan. Currently Dr. Skinner works as an Infectious Disease Specialist at the Regina Infectious Diseases Clinic, as well as traveling to several locations in Saskatchewan to provide Infections Disease clinics. In addition Dr. Skinner has been instrumental in designing the Wellness Wheel, which is a community led, multi-disciplinary and integrated approach to health care disparities affecting First Nation communities.

  • Maria Soonias Ali
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 8:45 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Promoting Youth Engagement: Techniques, Goals, and Challenges


    Maria Soonias Ali and Donna Banach are both YAP Coordinators at the Saskatchewan Prevention Institute. As part of the Institute’s FASD team, they support the work of the overall FASD Prevention Program. In addition, both Maria and Donna travel to communities throughout Saskatchewan to provide presentations to youth and adult allies in order to increase honest and safe conversations about alcohol-related harms. The YAP Program, in collaboration with the Institute’s Sexual and Reproductive Health Program, administers Youth Health Community Grants to support youth to raise awareness about sexual health, alcohol-related harms, and harm reduction in their community. The program also develops resources for both services providers and youth; most recently these have included the two facilitator manuals discussed during this training. In 2018, Donna was hired as the Northern Youth Action for Prevention Coordinator at the Saskatchewan Prevention Institute. Based in La Ronge, this position is uniquely positioned in the office of Integrated Justice Services Community Safety and Well-Being and allows for expansion of the YAP Program in Northern Saskatchewan.

  • Shelley Spurr
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 3:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Seeking to Improve Outcomes for Adolescents of Diverse Ethnicities Living with Undiagnosed Prediabetes and Type 2 Diabetes in Saskatchewan


    Shelley Spurr, PhD is a Registered Nurse (RN) and has over 20 years of pediatric nursing experience in a variety of areas including acute care, public health, and home care. Dr. Spurr is now working as an Associate Professor in the College of Nursing at the University of Saskatchewan. Dr. Spurr’s research focuses on developing prevention strategies and innovative approaches to screen for risk and complications of diabetes. Currently, Dr. Spurr is conducting an investigation that will generate insight into adolescents’ and parents’ experiences of prediabetes and type 2 diabetes and identify possibilities for community-based health promotion interventions.

  • Crystal Storey
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 8:45 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    TTYL: Helping Youth Put the WE in Wellness


    Crystal Storey is a Population Health Promotion Coordinator with the Saskatchewan Health Authority based out of Rosetown and works throughout west central Saskatchewan. She is involved in diverse initiatives whose purposes are to help people thrive at whatever stage of life they are in. Youth-focused ones are of particular interest to her, both in her professional and volunteer work. Crystal can often be found in her “free time” at the local youth centre or spending time with her nieces and nephews.

  • Dr. Hortense Nsoh Tabien
    (Concurrent Sessions)

    Oct. 3, 2019 | 8:45 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Improving the Child Health Clinic Experience


    Oct. 3, 2019 | 8:45 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Vaccinations and Immunization: What You Need to Know


    Dr. Hortense Nsoh Tabien obtained her Medical degree at the University of Milan, Italy and holds a PhD degree in Anatomy and Cell Biology from the University of Saskatchewan. She completed her residency/fellowship training in Public Health and Preventive Medicine (PHPM) at the University of Saskatchewan. Dr. Tabien is currently working as Medical Health Officer for the SHA, Saskatoon area covering the portfolio for Immunization and Travel Health. Her professional interest involves vulnerable groups including immigrant and refugee health, women health, and physician health. She is a mother of adorable twin boys, whom she describes as “her sunshine” and who give her the drive to do all. Dr. Tabien enjoys reading science fiction novels and learning new hobbies. She like sports and enjoys jogging, football (soccer), and dancing.

  • Dr. Valerie Tarasuk
    (Keynote Session)
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 1:15 p.m. – 1:45 p.m.

    Food Insecurity in Canada: The Case for Evidence-Based Policy


    (Keynote Panel)
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 1:45 p.m. – 2:45 p.m.

    Food Insecurity: Multiple Perspectives to Understand the Issue


    Valerie Tarasuk is a Professor in the Department of Nutritional Sciences at the University of Toronto, where she has been on faculty since 1994. The primary focus of her research is household food insecurity. She has led several tri-council research grants to elucidate the scope, nature, and health implications of this problem in Canada, assess the effectiveness of community responses, and determine how public policies and programs impact food insecurity prevalence and severity. In 2011, she led the establishment of PROOF, an interdisciplinary research program designed to identify effective policy approaches to reduce household food insecurity in Canada. In 2018, she received an honorary doctorate from Queen’s University in recognition of her work.

  • Dallas Tetarenko
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 3:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Tell It Like It Is: Engaging and Innovative Comprehensive Sexuality Education for People with Developmental Disabilities, and Those Who Support Them


    Dallas Tetarenko is a Community Inclusion Consultant for the Saskatchewan Association for Community Living. He has worked within the disability support sector for 10 years. Dallas pursues a variety of artistic endeavours, including ceramics, painting, sculpting, furniture design and fabrication, and drawing. He hosts his own radio program that features music from film, theatre, and television, which is currently finishing its sixth year of production.

  • Dr. Cassandra Opikokew Wajuntah
    (Keynote Panel)
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 1:45 p.m. – 2:45 p.m.

    Food Insecurity: Multiple Perspectives to Understand the Issue


    Cassandra is a member of Canoe Lake Cree First Nation and was raised in Meadow Lake in Northern Saskatchewan. She graduated at the top of her class in 2009 from the University of Regina with a Bachelor of Arts in Journalism (BAJ, Certificate in Indigenous Communication Arts (INCA) and a Master's of Public Administration (MPA). As a PhD candidate in public policy, she was the recipient of a CIHR Doctoral Research Award ($108,000) for her dissertation entitled The Indian Solution to the Policy Problem: Developing an Indigenous Policymaking Model to Address First Nations Health Disparities. She is working with Indigenous health organizations in Saskatchewan and Hawai’i to examine how self-determined Indigenous health policymaking models are more effective at improving the health of Indigenous people than Western colonial models. Professionally, she is currently Director of the Indigenous Peoples’ Health Research Centre (IPHRC) and was recently a Visiting Scholar at the U of Hawai’i's John A. Burns School of Medicine in the Department of Native Hawaiian Health. She currently resides in Fort Qu’Appelle, SK with her husband Justin, a member of Standing Buffalo Dakota First Nation, their 6 dogs and their 3 wild toddlers.

  • Kristyn White
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 3:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Tell It Like It Is: Engaging and Innovative Comprehensive Sexuality Education for People with Developmental Disabilities, and Those Who Support Them


    Kristyn White is a Personal Support Worker and Team Leader at Creative Options Regina (COR). Kristyn has been with COR for four years, and has been involved within the disability sector for eight years. She completed her Bachelor of Sport and Reaction Studies majoring in Therapeutic Recreation in 2016 from the University of Regina, and completed her field work practicum at Inclusion Regina. Kristyn is planning to start working on her MSc this fall, and would like to focus her graduate research on sexual health and education for those experiencing disability. Kristyn is passionate about empowering individuals experiencing disability, and encouraging people to make their own decisions regarding their bodies, their lives, and their own experiences. Kristyn is dedicated to educating others on Gentle Teaching, person-centered thinking, and creating meaningful relationships within disability support work.

  • Cara Zukewich
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 8:45 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Child Injury Prevention Programming and Action Guide


    Cara Zukewich works at the Saskatchewan Prevention Institute as the Child Injury Prevention Program Coordinator. Cara’s role is to promote the importance of injury prevention for children. Developing injury prevention resources for professionals and caregivers using evidence-based information is a major aspect of the Injury Prevention Program. Cara works with communities to meet their needs (proactively and on request) and represents the Prevention Institute on interagency committees. The purpose of the Child Injury Prevention Coordinator is to organize training efforts, on a variety of injury topics, including child passenger safety, bicycle safety, playground safety, home safety, with the possibility of additional focus areas. Cara has been with the Prevention Institute since 2002 working on resource development, knowledge translation, facilitation, and planning professional development opportunities.

Abstracts

  • Everyone
  • Concurrent Sessions
  • Keynote Sessions
  • Oct. 2, 2019 | 10:15 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.
    Welcome
    Learn More
    Oct. 2, 2019 | 10:15 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.

    Welcome

  • Oct. 2, 2019 | 10:30 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.
    Framing to Enhance Public Understanding: Strategies for Communicating About Healthy Childhood Development
    Learn More
    Oct. 2, 2019 | 10:30 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

    Framing to Enhance Public Understanding: Strategies for Communicating About Healthy Childhood Development

    Jessica Moyer

    Abstract: Adopting a shared communications strategy can help advocates expand the reach and deepen the impact of their work — and it doesn’t need to be a guessing game. This keynote will present findings from social science research conducted by the FrameWorks Institute on how Canadians understand issues like childhood development and early adversity, including common assumptions that impede support for needed policies and stall progressive social change. Most importantly, you’ll leave with a set of empirically-tested tools for reframing the national conversation in more productive ways.

  • Oct. 2, 2019 | 1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.
    Engaging Community and Families to Promote Culturally Safe Care for Indigenous Mothers in Saskatchewan
    Learn More
    Oct. 2, 2019 | 1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.

    Engaging Community and Families to Promote Culturally Safe Care for Indigenous Mothers in Saskatchewan

    Angela Bowen, Dr. Holly Graham, Carrie Pratt and Janice Osecap

    Colonization robbed many Indigenous mothers of their ability to know or experience their traditional birth and parenting teachings and ceremonies; this has contributed to health disparities for Indigenous families. Research shows the use of cultural practices in pregnancy and birth helps close the gap in health inequities and creates a foundation for healthy child development. We believe providing culturally safe care in pregnancy and childbirth has the potential to support mothers and promote kindship. Supporting Indigenous mothers to practice their culture in pregnancy aligns with the Saskatchewan Prevention Institute’s goals to prevent conditions such as FASD, tobacco use in pregnancy, and to promote healthy parenting.

    To improve health services for Indigenous mothers, we developed an innovative methodology that involves the research participants in the actual research process. We held interviews with 26 Indigenous mothers from urban and rural Saskatchewan who gave birth between January 2017 and September 2018, within one year of the delivery. We analyzed the interviews using a collaborative team approach that included an Elder, mothers, practitioners, and researchers. The final step will involve the mothers to create a multimedia learning tool to help educate care providers about the importance of providing culturally safe care.

    For healthcare providers and community workers to provide effective interventions, the community members (such as family or clients) should be included as early and often as possible at all stages of your work. We believe that families and communities understand themselves best, and it is important to engage them to find solutions that work for them. We will discuss strategies to engage with families and clients to address their challenges. Participants will have the opportunity to learn about research methods that respect Indigenous research ethics and values, and how they can use these methods in their own line of work.

  • Oct. 2, 2019 | 1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.
    The Role of Doulas in Healthcare
    Learn More
    Oct. 2, 2019 | 1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.

    The Role of Doulas in Healthcare

    Brooke Graham

    Research shows that one of the most effective tools to improve labour and delivery outcomes is the continuous presence of support personnel, such as a doula. But what is a doula? Evidence shows doulas can be a valuable addition to the birth team when working with a family physician, registered midwife, or obstetrician. What are the strengths that doulas bring to the team and what are their professional boundaries and limitations? This presentation will outline the professional role of doulas on a care team and describe how they have come to be a part of the birth experiences in La Ronge.

  • Oct. 2, 2019 | 1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.
    Youth Who Thrive
    Learn More
    Oct. 2, 2019 | 1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.

    Youth Who Thrive

    Dave Shanks

    Abstract: Youth Who Thrive is an extensive literature review of the latest evidence on what factors contribute to the positive development of young people. Autonomy, Competency, Relatedness, and Engagement are key factors that will be discussed. This presentation will lead participants through the findings and impart real world solutions and activities that can be undertaken in order to create ideal circumstances for youth to thrive, including ten key features of effective youth programs.

  • Oct. 2, 2019 | 1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.
    Hear our Voices: A Conversation about Youth, Mental Health, & Creative Expression
    Learn More
    Oct. 2, 2019 | 1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.

    Hear our Voices: A Conversation about Youth, Mental Health, & Creative Expression

    Dawn Kellington

    There is an important conversation that is happening and needs to continue to happen regarding mental health challenges and forms of violence experienced by youth. Youth who have experienced and are experiencing mental health challenges and/or forms of violence have an essential voice in this conversation. The stories of youth with lived experience can be shared in a powerful way through visual and written art. Through these creative avenues, young people can process their experiences, find meaning in their experiences, and share their experiences with others offering solidarity, hope, and inspiration. Youth advocates involved with the Survivor 101 Youth voice projects are high school students who have felt empowered to share their stories and experiences through youth compiled publications; Day by Day: A Handbook for Teens and Hand in Hand: A Guidebook for Adults. Through this process they have found strength, healing, and growth. Their stories are powerful tools to share with other youth, health professionals, and community leaders to affect change. The role of storytelling through creative expression can be a powerful intervention for youth who are experiencing mental health challenges and/or forms of violence. The process of telling one’s story can also be a platform for a young person to gain the skills needed to become a leader and advocate. These stories are also a valuable learning tool and provide insight for service providers, family members, and community leaders. Decisions and conversations about youth mental health and violence need to include these stories of youth who have and are experiencing mental health challenges and/or violence.

  • Oct. 2, 2019 | 1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.
    Exploring Pediatric Oral Health In and With One Indigenous Community
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    Oct. 2, 2019 | 1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.

    Exploring Pediatric Oral Health In and With One Indigenous Community

    Dr. Marcella Ogenchuk

    Purpose: Dental caries is the most common chronic childhood disease in Canada. Early childhood caries can have serious consequences for the well-being of children. The objective of this study was to explore and identify the strengths and barriers related to oral health services with an Indigenous community in Saskatchewan. Methods: A mixed-methods study, aligned with Chapter 9 of the Tri-Council Policy Statement, utilizing community-based participatory research. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with Elders, healthcare providers, teachers, and parents/guardians of elementary school-aged children (n=28). The community will participate in data analysis, interpretation of the results, and will identify next steps. Results/Outcomes: The research process includes tool development with the community; to identify their strengths and opportunities for change and subsequently to generate solutions to the practical barriers; and, potentially transform the health system accessed by the communities. The outcomes include several steps including presentation of the findings and overall themes to key stakeholders, and the development of strategies with the larger community. The most commonly identified themes included: the need for resource development and process to improve oral health literacy and skills; access to supplies and healthy food; importance of family in knowledge translation, and existing community infrastructure. Conclusions: The next steps are being defined with the community, to ensure sustainability and have the potential to enhance prevention among young children. The research process is as significant as developing the findings with the community; providing for the development of authentic community engagement, focusing on strengths and capacities they have identified and thus informing sustainable policy and practice.

  • Oct. 2, 2019 | 1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.
    Oral Health, General Health, and Overall Well-being – Why Prevention Matters
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    Oct. 2, 2019 | 1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.

    Oral Health, General Health, and Overall Well-being – Why Prevention Matters

    Dr. Keith Da Silva

    Tooth decay remains the most common chronic disease of childhood and the most common cause of day surgeries in Canada. When left untreated, tooth decay can lead to infection, pain, and premature loss of teeth. Children with untreated decay can suffer from malnutrition, poor growth, and a reduced oral health related quality of life. We know that oral health is an integral component of our overall health and well-being; however, oral health care has long been separated from the general health care system and access to dental care remains a challenge. Due to the increased awareness of the common risk factors and social determinants of health, an integrated and interdisciplinary approach to oral health care is required. In this seminar, we will review the oral health – systemic health connection, as well as innovations in public health dentistry that focus on an interdisciplinary approach to prevention, and upstream policy solutions that promote healthy child development and good oral health.

  • Oct. 2, 2019 | 1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.
    Paediatric School-Based Health: A community based alternate moldel of care
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    Oct. 2, 2019 | 1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.

    Paediatric School-Based Health: A community based alternate moldel of care

    Dr. Maryam Mehtar

    Abstract: Paediatric-School Based clinics were established in 2007 by the Division of Social Paediatrics in partnership with the Greater Saskatoon Catholic School Division and the Saskatoon Tribal Council. The school-based clinics provide access to Paediatric care to infants, children, and youth who come from low-income families. Services are delivered within communities through an alternate model of care located within schools. The model allows clinicians to deliver care, and exchange knowledge across sectors and organizations, given the location within schools. At a time when academic health centers are needing to move towards meaningful community engagement, the Division of Social Paediatrics has adopted a more comprehensive approach in meeting the needs of patients and families within a broader community context in addressing how the social determinants of health influences access to health and the lack of choice and control for people. This bidirectional approach to relationships with individuals and organizations are based on mutual trust, respect, and cultural humility. Paediatric school-based clinics are ideally located to ensure reciprocity in paediatric healthcare for paediatric patients; and between sectors.

  • Oct. 2, 2019 | 1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.
    Changing the Story about Alcohol
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    Oct. 2, 2019 | 1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.

    Changing the Story about Alcohol

    Joan Johnson and Dr. James Irvine

    The Northern Alcohol Strategy (NAS) commenced in 2016 with the secondment of three senior staff from Saskatchewan Justice. Dr. James Irvine from Population Health has provided ongoing support and mentorship. The vision of the NAS is to reduce alcohol-related harms by empowering local communities to change the story. Following extensive research into best practices and opening the conversation about the harms from alcohol in northern Saskatchewan, grassroots community consultations and surveys in the Lac La Ronge region were conducted and compiled into a regional Community Alcohol Management Plan (CAMP). This 2016-2021 Action Plan was endorsed by the leadership of the town of La Ronge, the village of Air Ronge, and Lac La Ronge Indian Band, in July 2016. The CAMP utilizes a multi-sectoral approach with committee representatives appointed by leadership in the three communities and human services representatives. The NAS continues to support the CAMP committee, which meets quarterly, by collecting and analyzing data for the purposes of monitoring and evaluation and by overcoming obstacles and barriers. In November 2016, a Northern Alcohol Strategy report, including 14 recommendations, was submitted to senior government officials. Many of the recommendations have been implemented and others are in progress. In April 2018, the Northern Alcohol Strategy transitioned to an initiative under the Community Safety and Well-Being branch that is working at both community and population levels to support and measure the implementation of multidimensional, community-led and evidence-based approaches. The Northern Alcohol Strategy continues to provide supports to communities who request assistance in building capacity across sectors and jurisdictions to address harms from alcohol.

  • Oct. 2, 2019 | 1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.
    Indigenous Wellness as Prevention
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    Oct. 2, 2019 | 1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.

    Indigenous Wellness as Prevention

    Dr. Alexandra King

    Abstract: For many Indigenous people, good health is important, but wellness is critical. This paradigmatically different approach is more comprehensive and interconnected. Wellness – as care and prevention – will be discussed in the context of Indigenous women living in Saskatoon. This will include consideration of the development of a wholistic wellness centre for Indigenous women, both theoretical underpinnings and their operationalization.

  • Oct. 2, 2019 | 3:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.
    Knowledge Exchange for Healthy Families & Communities - An Interactive Event
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    Oct. 2, 2019 | 3:00 –p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

    Knowledge Exchange for Healthy Families & Communities - An Interactive Event

    Erin Beckwell

    Abstract: Are you unsure about how to get knowledge out into your community – and how to gather knowledge from your communities? Are you curious about how to bridge the gap between knowledge and action? This interactive session will explore the basic principles of knowledge translation and exchange, and provide knowledge exchange examples and tools.

  • Oct. 3, 2019 | 8:45 a.m. – 9:45 a.m.
    Mobilizing Knowledge for More Accessible and Effective Patient Care
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    Oct. 3, 2019 | 8:45 a.m. – 9:45 a.m.

    (Medical Stream)

    Mobilizing Knowledge for More Accessible and Effective Patient Care

    Erin Beckwell

    Abstract: Using a variety of learning strategies, this workshop will focus on providing physicians with an understanding of the importance of knowledge exchange (KE) processes and products in patient care. By discussing KE principles and practice examples, participants will acquire practical skills to support them to use evidence and health information to provide more responsive, accessible, and effective health information to patients and families. To directly apply the workshop content to participants’ practice contexts, each participant is asked to bring at least one practice example to work with during the session, such as patient education material or other product used to communicate health information (poster, infographic, curriculum, brochure, etc.) in their practice, a patient communication need or challenge, or data they wish to share patients, families, or health care teams. Participants will leave the workshop with a basic understanding of KE tools and plans for applying KE principles in their practice setting.

    Learning Objectives:
    By the end of this presentation, the audience should be able to:

    • Describe the principles of knowledge exchange as they apply in patient and family health care settings.
    • Identify opportunities for applying knowledge translation and exchange tools and strategies within their practice setting(s).

  • Oct. 3, 2019 | 8:45 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.
    Standardizing Prenatal Education
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    Oct. 3, 2019 | 8:45 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.

    Standardizing Prenatal Education

    Audrey Boyer

    Northern Saskatchewan has been working towards standardizing prenatal education to promote all pregnant women receiving evidence-based information during their pregnancies, regardless of where they live. Service providers from provincial and federal organizations have been working together to create resources for all levels of providers to be used in all jurisdictions and locations across the north. The program is based on peer-reviewed information produced by the Saskatchewan Prevention Institute (Your Pregnancy Month-by-Month) and incorporates desires learned from speaking with northern women. The inter-agency team that prepared the resources rolled out in-person training across the north in various locations and continues to offer general and expanded trainings via WebEx in 2019. Collaboration and knowledge exchange are central to this work. The pre-existing collaborative model of the Northern Healthy Communities Partnership contributed to the collective and administrative means of delivering this program out across the north. The objectives of this session are to share the outputs (resources) to date, describe the process of collaborative work, and inform participants of the resources still to come.

  • Oct. 3, 2019 | 8:45 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.
    My Saskatchewan Pregnancy – A Prenatal App
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    Oct. 3, 2019 | 8:45 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.

    My Saskatchewan Pregnancy – A Prenatal App

    Sarah Fang
  • Oct. 3, 2019 | 8:45 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.
    TTYL: Helping Youth Put the WE in Wellness
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    Oct. 3, 2019 | 8:45 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.

    TTYL: Helping Youth Put the WE in Wellness

    Crystal Storey, Liza Dahl, and Jhalene Groth

    TTYL (Talking To Youth Live) provides factual information to grade 8 students on mental wellness, drugs, and alcohol, while developing coping skills, fostering positive relationships with local professionals, and creating personal support systems for the youth. It is a one-day event with the goal of creating a foundation for youth to recognize within themselves and those around them when they are struggling with a wellness issue, building practical resilience tools and making it easier for them to seek professional help if needed. Multiple disciplines work collaboratively to provide a broad view of life choices, consequences, and how we can all support one another. By the health and education systems working together, we have increased opportunities to support youth well past the day of the TTYL event in their normal environments. The youth are then better able to utilize and build upon their new knowledge and skills to affect the culture within their own schools and families. TTYL shows that engaging youth in a meaningful way does not need to be expensive and can be done anywhere. This is a very versatile initiative that could be used in varied settings and adapted to meet the needs of the youth and communities being served.

  • Oct. 3, 2019 | 8:45 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.
    The Community Safety Education Strategy: Sustaining a Path to Cultural Transformation
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    Oct. 3, 2019 | 8:45 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.

    The Community Safety Education Strategy: Sustaining a Path to Cultural Transformation

    Barbara Compton and Gord Moker

    The Community Safety Education Strategy (CSES) is a comprehensive, provincial framework that sets out a path for providing injury prevention education, resources, and supports for Saskatchewan children and youth in the K-12 education system. The CSES is aimed at school divisions and their employees, with a focus on students in all grade levels, and recognizes the importance of community and industry support, participation, and engagement. Gord Moker, CEO, and Barb Compton, CSES Coordinator, Safe Saskatchewan, will provide an overview of the CSES; its vision of an injury-free Saskatchewan where safe lifestyles influence how we live, learn, work and play; and its mission of empowering Saskatchewan youth to live injury-free.

  • Oct. 3, 2019 | 8:45 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.
    Improving the Child Health Clinic Experience
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    Oct. 3, 2019 | 8:45 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.

    Improving the Child Health Clinic Experience

    Dr. Jasmine Hasselback and Dr. Hortense Nsoh Tabien

    Abstract: Purpose: To improve the services provided at the Child Health Clinics attended by children and their caregivers at age 2, 4, 6, 12, 18 months, and 4 years in the Saskatoon area. Background: Public Health Clinics across the former Saskatoon Health Region offer immunization to children at ages 2, 4, 6, 12, 18 months, and 4 years. In the same visit, a Public Health Nurse will provide assessment and support around healthy growth and development of the child. Evaluation and improvement of this service was deemed timely and appropriate. Method: Value stream mapping was completed of these four types of clinic visits. The current state was challenged against providers and clients and a future state was built. From that several small changes were implemented to move in that direction. Findings: Through this process it was identified that empowering the caregiver to control the material addressed at the visit was a widespread desire. Implementation: A visual tool was developed that was piloted at a single site and continues to be used. This tool provides caregivers the opportunity to flag issues of interest for that visit.

  • Oct. 3, 2019 | 8:45 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.
    Caring for Women* Who Use Substances in Pregnancy and Their Infants: Recognizing the Structural and Socioeconomic Factors That Impact Women* and Families and Interventions to Improve Mother-Infant Outcomes
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    Oct. 3, 2019 | 8:45 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.

    Caring for Women* Who Use Substances in Pregnancy and Their Infants: Recognizing the Structural and Socioeconomic Factors That Impact Women* and Families and Interventions to Improve Mother-Infant Outcomes

    *We recognize that not all people who are pregnant identify as women and the importance of using the preferred pronouns of our clients
    Dr. Kali Gartner and Dr. Cassie Pancyr

    Abstract: Substance use by women in pregnancy is difficult to estimate due to stigma and judgement experienced by people who use drugs and especially people who use illegal drugs in pregnancy. The Public Health Agency of Canada identifies substance use in pregnancy (e.g. alcohol, tobacco, opioids, stimulants) as a concern that impacts people across all socioeconomic demographics. However, the co-occurence of substance use, poverty, racism and violence often has devastating impacts for women, their infants, and families. Women who use substances in pregnancy may fear accessing medical and social services due to past experiences of violence, stigma and especially the fear of child apprehension due to disclosure of their substance use. This can lead to avoidance of medical and prenatal care and delay access to Addiction and Mental Health Services. The literature suggests that harm reduction, patient and family centred, low barrier, and holistic services are required to meet the socioeconomic needs of women. These services can be integrated with prenatal care in a primary care setting. This presentation will aim to describe the structural and socioeconomic factors that impact many women with substance use in pregnancy. We will describe best practice guidelines and Canadian examples for care for women in the prenatal period and mother-infant-families in the postpartum period and beyond. We will describe the evidence for mother-infant dyad care in hospital including the evidence for the “Eat, Sleep, Console” approach to monitoring neonatal opioid withdrawal in hospital. Saskatchewan has led the way in developing innovative, trauma informed programming to support mother-infant togetherness for women impacted by substance use and trauma in pregnancy. The Sanctum 1.5 model of mother-infant care will be described including some early data describing the impact of this new made in Saskatchewan approach to caring for families.

  • Oct. 3, 2019 | 8:45 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.
    Child Injury Prevention Programming and Action Guide
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    Oct. 3, 2019 | 8:45 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.

    Child Injury Prevention Programming and Action Guide

    Cara Zukewich

    Abstract: Injuries are preventable, yet approximately 69 children die each year in Saskatchewan due to injury. The goal of this session is to raise awareness of injury risks and best practices to reduce the number of injury-related deaths and decrease the risk of life-altering injury. By the end of this session, participants will be able to understand:

    • key concepts in injury prevention
    • why children are more at risk of injury
    • the top causes of injury-related hospitalization for Saskatchewan children and youth from 2004 to 2013
    • taking action to prevent life-altering injury

    Session participants will receive a copy of the Child Injury Prevention Programming and Action Guide. This resource was developed for community-based programs to use in their work with families to help prevent child injury. This resource will also be of interest to public health professionals, early childhood educators, daycare providers, and others working with caregivers and children.

  • Oct. 3, 2019 | 8:45 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.
    Baby's Best Start Prenatal Program
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    Oct. 3, 2019 | 8:45 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.

    Baby's Best Start Prenatal Program

    Veronica Hawley and Erin Hewitt

    Abstract: The primary purpose of prenatal care is to improve and maintain the health and well-being of mothers, babies, and families. Traditional prenatal classes do not always appeal to or meet the needs of at-risk populations. Many of these families experience barriers to accessing prenatal education, care, and nutrition during their pregnancies. The overall goal of “Babies Best Start” (BBS) is to reach and support vulnerable pregnant women and families that may not have access to or may be under-served by mainstream health services. Our focus is to build on strengths within individuals in order to build confidence and capacity to grow a healthy baby and family. We utilize a holistic approach, recognizing the correlation between the multiple challenges and barriers the families of BBS experience. These barriers often include: low-income, mental health issues, cognitive impairments, low literacy level, insecure access to food, low social support, and a history of substance abuse. We practice facilitation, not instruction, and understand that basic needs should be addressed before parenting issues can be solved. We have established partnerships with other disciplines in order to provide better integration of services, referrals to other community agencies, and a client-centered circle of care. This presentation will provide the attendees with an overview of the BBS program and the opportunity to utilize and implement a similar model of care in their community. It is our hope that by sharing the successes and challenges we have encountered within our program with other health care professionals, they will return to their home communities and advocate for similar programming.

  • Oct. 3, 2019 | 8:45 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.
    Vaccinations and Immunization: What You Need to Know
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    Oct. 3, 2019 | 8:45 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.

    Vaccinations and Immunization: What You Need to Know

    Dr. Hortense Nsoh Tabien

    Abstract: This session aims to introduce the topic of childhood vaccination/immunization and provide attendees with a broad understanding of the topic, including the science behind vaccines, why herd immunity is important, and the health benefits association with vaccines. The immunization program for children in Saskatchewan will be discussed and the role that diverse service providers play in supporting families around vaccinations.

  • Oct. 3, 2019 | 8:45 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.
    Promoting Youth Engagement: Techniques, Goals, and Challenges
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    Oct. 3, 2019 | 8:45 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.

    Promoting Youth Engagement: Techniques, Goals, and Challenges

    Maria Soonias Ali and Donna Banach

    Abstract: The Youth Action for Prevention (YAP) Program is a youth-focused FASD prevention program that works to increase the knowledge that Saskatchewan youth have regarding alcohol and alcohol-related harms. The philosophy of youth engagement is the basis of the YAP Program. Youth are supported to create positive change in their lives and in their community. Service providers working with youth are encouraged to learn new ways to engage the young people they work with. In addition, service providers are supported to approach important but challenging topics in a way that remains relevant to the realities of young people today, but also creates room for reflection and discussion from all participants. An important piece of our program direction has been helping youth discuss their experiences with alcohol in an open and honest way, while providing them with education about alcohol-related harms, and promoting healthy ways of coping with challenges in their lives. Our program work, including toolkits, presentations, and trainings are all adapted and directed by program evaluations. This allows us to maintain relevant content and address areas of concern for all participants. This session will discuss youth engagement, what it means to be an adult ally and, with audience participation, demonstrate a module from the toolkit From “At-Risk” to Resilient: Engaging Tools For Working With Youth To Reduce Alcohol-Related Harms. With this presentation, we hope you are able to gain some insight as to the different ways that youth engagement can look from the perspective of a service provider.

  • Oct. 3, 2019 | 9:45 a.m. – 10:45 a.m.
    A Combined Response to Address Health Gaps in Indigenous Communities
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    Oct. 3, 2019 | 9:45 a.m. – 10:45 a.m.

    (Medical Stream)

    A Combined Response to Address Health Gaps in Indigenous Communities

    Dr. Stuart Skinner

    Abstract: Indigenous peoples are over-represented in Saskatchewan in regards to rates of many chronic diseases, including HIV, hepatitis C and diabetes, and they have poorer outcomes when living with chronic disease. Further, significant barriers to care exist for those living in Indigenous communities that contribute to these rates and outcomes. Despite these disparities, current health services are not focused upon or dedicated to address the unique health challenges for those individuals with chronic disease living on-reserve. Moreover, communities are often not consulted and are left out of conversations around health care systems and delivery that affect health. Unique models of health care delivery, led by community, are required to address these health disparities. The Wellness Wheel is a unique team of health providers and researchers that works closely in partnership with community to provide a combination of Western and Indigenous medicine to reduce disparities, engage patients and communities, to improve access to care and outcomes. This talk will discuss this unique program, its partnerships, and a potential way forward.

    Learning Objectives:
    At the end of the session, attendees will be able to:

    • Describe the current health disparities and challenges for Indigenous peoples living on-reserve in Saskatchewan.
    • Describe the Wellness Wheel and its use to develop partnerships between providers and communities for chronic disease for Indigenous peoples.
    • Discuss opportunities to build on, adapt and expand this model of care for Indigenous peoples.

  • Oct. 3, 2019 | 11:00 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.
    Optimizing Vaccine Uptake – Addressing Vaccine Hesitancy
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    Oct. 3, 2019 | 11:00 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.

    Optimizing Vaccine Uptake – Addressing Vaccine Hesitancy

    Dr. Noni MacDonald

    Learning Objectives:
    By the end of this presentation, the audience should be able to:

    • Define vaccine hesitancy and the continuum from acceptance to refusal.
    • List factors that contribute to hesitancy in different contexts with different vaccines.
    • Outline evidence informed strategies for addressing hesitancy and improving vaccine uptake at the program and patient levels.
    • Describe key factors (and pitfalls) in developing immunization program and patient communication strategies.
    • Describe key elements of risk communication.
    • Identify why supporting vaccine acceptance resiliency is important and identify the role of diverse providers, from clinicians to community support workers, in this support.

  • Oct. 3, 2019 | 1:15 p.m. – 1:45 p.m.
    Food Insecurity in Canada: The Case for Evidence-Based Policy
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    Oct. 3, 2019 | 1:15 p.m. – 1:45 p.m.

    Food Insecurity in Canada: The Case for Evidence-Based Policy

    Dr. Valerie Tarasuk

    Abstract: Household food insecurity, the inadequate or insecure food access due to financial constraints, is a serious problem in Canada. A recent analysis of Canadian Community Health Survey data from the ten provinces indicates that 13.8% of households were food insecure, and 19.1% of children under the age of 18 lived in food insecure families in 2017. Rates in the territories will likely be even higher, when the data become available. With 25 years of population-level measurement and monitoring in Canada, the social epidemiology of food insecurity has been well charted, as have its health implications. In Canada, food insecurity is associated with heightened nutritional vulnerability, increased risk of physical and mental health problems, poorer management of chronic conditions, higher mortality rates, and higher health care costs. With this evidence has come a growing recognition of the need for more effective responses to address food insecurity, but we have yet to see public policy interventions explicitly designed to impact this outcome. Nonetheless, reductions in the prevalence and severity of food insecurity have been observed following federal and provincial interventions that have improved the financial circumstances of very low income households. These research findings highlight the power of public policy decisions to shape households’ food security and point to promising directions for future policy reforms.

    Learning Objectives:
    By the end of this presentation, the audience should be able to:

    • Describe the scope and nature of household food insecurity in Canada.
    • Describe the health implications associated with food insecurity in Canada.
    • Apply an awareness of food insecurity when assessing public policy decisions.

  • Oct. 3, 2019 | 1:45 p.m. – 2:45 p.m.
    Food Insecurity: Multiple Perspectives to Understand the Issue
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    Oct. 3, 2019 | 1:45 p.m. – 2:45 p.m.

    Food Insecurity: Multiple Perspectives to Understand the Issue

    Dr. Valerie Tarasuk, Dr. Cassandra Opikokew Wajuntah, and Dr. Mahli Brindamour

    The panel aims to bring diverse perspectives to a discussion on food insecurity in Saskatchewan and Canada. Perspectives include: national understanding, current research, policy implications, Indigenous experiences, programming responses, impact on women’s mental health, impact on chronic disease, health outcomes for children, and many others.

    Learning Objectives:
    By the end of this presentation, the audience should be able to:

    • Explain the issue of food insecurity and its’ impact on health and well-being outcomes from diverse perspectives.
    • Describe local, provincial, and national responses to the issue of food insecurity.
    • Explain the role of diverse professions in addressing the issue.

  • Oct. 3, 2019 | 3:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.
    Increasing our Capacity to Support the Healthy Development of Young Children in Saskatchewan: Zero to Three Fellowship
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    Oct. 3, 2019 | 3:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.

    Increasing our Capacity to Support the Healthy Development of Young Children in Saskatchewan: Zero to Three Fellowship

    Lee Hinton

    Abstract: Every child in Saskatchewan has the right to develop and thrive to the best of their ability regardless of race, culture, religion, or socio-economic background. Every citizen, program, and community has a role in the development of children. During this presentation, Lee Hinton will discuss the role(s) that participants can play, in their communities and workplaces, in transforming programs, systems and policies that impact the lives of infants.

  • Oct. 3, 2019 | 3:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.
    A Community Safety and Well-Being Framework for Saskatchewan
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    Oct. 3, 2019 | 3:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.

    A Community Safety and Well-Being Framework for Saskatchewan

    Gina Alexander

    All agencies have a role in improving community safety and well-being. By working collaboratively at the local level, we will be in a better position to improve the lives of Saskatchewan citizens. Local leadership, important multi-sector collaboration, and responses are centered on achieving shared outcomes. A framework is intended to be a place to start a conversation on assets and gaps in communities and how to create change towards more upstream interventions that are rooted in data and social outcomes. Functioning social development initiatives work together in ways that challenge conventional assumptions about limitations and organizational cultures, and ensure that individuals, families, and communities are safe, healthy, educated, housed, employed, and have social networks that they can trust.

    Prevention requires hands-on implementation of strategies, policies, or programs to diminish potential threats to a community’s safety and well-being. Data and information sharing on community assets, trends, and vulnerable people will identify priority areas to react effectively, while demonstrating both moral and economic benefits of such prevention work. Risk intervention involves many areas working together to immediately address and avert situations where there is a high risk of harm, such as crime, emergency room visits, or a child apprehension, and reduce the systemic reliance on such response. Collaboration and data sharing between agencies, such as “types of risk", have created partnerships and allowed for collective analysis of risk-based data in the development of strategies in prevention and social areas. Incident Response is the immediate and reactionary response that may involve a sense of urgency. Systems involved in this level of response are highly trained, efficiently organized, and required to assess needs and mobilize appropriate responses promptly and effectively. Initiatives in this area alone cannot be relied upon to increase community safety and well-being.

  • Oct. 3, 2019 | 3:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.
    Seeking to Improve Outcomes for Adolescents of Diverse Ethnicities Living with Undiagnosed Prediabetes and Type 2 Diabetes in Saskatchewan
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    Oct. 3, 2019 | 3:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.

    Seeking to Improve Outcomes for Adolescents of Diverse Ethnicities Living with Undiagnosed Prediabetes and Type 2 Diabetes in Saskatchewan

    Shelley Spurr, Jill Bally, Carol Bullin, and Erick McNair

    Background: In Canada, the incidence of type 2 diabetes (T2D) in children and adolescents is increasing, and furthermore, certain ethnic groups are disproportionately affected by T2D1,2. In this presentation, the risk factors will be reported along with the prevalence of undiagnosed prediabetes and T2D in adolescents from diverse ethnicities including Indigenous, Filipino, and European.

    Methods: A total of 396 adolescents, aged 14-19, were screened for risk factors of prediabetes and T2D.

    Results: The Filipino group had a significantly higher prevalence of elevated blood glucose (46.2%, n=42), followed by the Indigenous (21.5%, n=35), and European (10.3%, n=8) groups. A significantly high number of adolescents from the European group (59%) were classified with prehypertension/hypertension, followed by the Filipino (50.5%), and the Indigenous (25.8%) groups. Based on body mass index, Indigenous adolescents (39.9%) were more likely to be overweight/obese, followed by the Filipino (37.4%), and European (34.6%) groups.

    Practice Implications: The findings reported herein provide a deeper understanding of the prevalence and risk of type 2 diabetes in adolescents. The rates of elevated blood glucose is relevant to a multitude of healthcare providers, particularly nurses who are most often the first point of entry into the health system. As such, nurses are in an optimal position to consider establishing health promoting strategies and screening programs that are adapted to the realities and culture of these adolescents. This plan should be personalized taking into account financial resources, and emphasize the importance of all healthcare providers being receptive and respectful of the cultural practices of the family.

    Given the finding that adolescents living in Saskatchewan have significant risk factors for type 2 diabetes, cultural practices that may contribute to childhood obesity need to be considered. Pediatric, community, and diabetes nurses, nurse educators, certified diabetes educators, and clinical nurse specialists work closely with families and adolescents and are well-positioned to better understand the cultural context associated with the experience of diabetes. These nurses have the opportunity to play a key role in the promotion of healthy lifestyles with the goal of improving health outcomes in adolescents. Due to the increased risk of developing prediabetes and type 2 diabetes, it is important that healthcare providers engage and collaborate with families to develop culturally appropriate screening and health promoting strategies.

    1. Amed, S., Dean, H. J., Panagiotopoulos, C., et al. Type 2 diabetes, medication-induced diabetes, and monogenic diabetes in Canadian children: a prospective national surveillance study. Diabetes Care 2010;33(4):786-91.
    2. Panagiotopoulos, C., Hadjiyannakis, S., Henderson, M. Type 2 Diabetes in Children and Adolescents. Canadian Journal of Diabetes 2018;42 Suppl 1:S247-S54.
  • Oct. 3, 2019 | 3:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.
    Healthy Start/Départ Santé for Families (HSFF): A Collaborative, Multi-stakeholders Initiative to Support Families in Making Healthy Changes
    Learn More
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 3:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.

    Healthy Start/Départ Santé for Families (HSFF): A Collaborative, Multi-stakeholders Initiative to Support Families in Making Healthy Changes

    Kavitha Ramachandran, Dr. Louise Humbert, and Dr. Amanda Froehlich Chow

    Background: Childhood obesity continues to be a public health concern in Canada and worldwide. There is uncertainty regarding the most effective approaches for preventing it and addressing its impacts on children, families, and population at-large. Purpose: The goal of our collaborative and community-participatory work was to design and implement a family engagement initiative to support parents with young children in being physically active and eating healthy as a family. Methods: Using the population health approach, this research was guided by a literature review within the field of prevention science, an adapted engagement framework, and community consultations. Over one year we interviewed 25 parents and consulted with at least 15 stakeholders and community partners including two Elders as well as one Traditional Knowledge Keeper. Then four focus groups were conducted to better tailor the initiative to diverse delivery contexts. Results: The Healthy Start for Families initiative consists of simple, fun-filled, child-friendly, and interactive family activities focused on healthy eating, culturally relevant physical activities, games, and physical literacy, delivered in three 90-minute sessions. It is designed to be implemented in four real-world settings: Early Learning Childcare Centres (ELCCs), Schools, Family Resource Centres (FRCs) and the Home environment. HSFF was pilot-tested in three childcare centres serving immigrant and refugee children and Francophone children, one Indigenous school setting, and six homes. This approach was well received by parents, families, and staff members of ELCCs. Specific findings will be presented at the conference. Conclusion: To address the multiple and complex factors influencing childhood obesity, the actions should be collaborative, multifaceted, and intersectoral. Involving and supporting families is a key component of success towards improving health outcomes for young children. The findings from this work could also inform both policy and public health practice to increase physical activity and healthy eating in multiple settings where children live and play.

  • Oct. 3, 2019 | 3:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.
    Physical Literacy Enriched Communities: Baseline Results of a Home, School, and Community Approach to Improving Physical Literacy
    Learn More
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 3:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.

    Physical Literacy Enriched Communities: Baseline Results of a Home, School, and Community Approach to Improving Physical Literacy

    Natalie Houser, Dr. Louise Humbert, and Dr. Marta Erlandson

    Abstract: Despite the well-recognized health benefits associated with physical activity, Canadian children and youth are not sufficiently active. One way to enhance physical activity participation is through the development of physical literacy. Physical literacy is described as the physical competence, motivation and confidence, and knowledge and understanding to value and take part in physical activities for life. It is suggested that those meeting physical activity and sedentary behaviour guidelines have higher physical literacy, thus influencing a healthier lifestyle. Currently, little evidence exists on successful ways to enhance physical literacy development in children and youth, which is something this study seeks to address.

    Saskatchewan in motion and the Partners for Physical Literacy (with representation from Sport, Education, Recreation, and Research) have utilized a mobilization approach to support community action to enhance physical literacy and physical activity opportunities for children and youth. Initiatives within this intervention focus on home, school, and community level changes, encouraging shared responsibility to enhance physical literacy. Children and youth’s physical literacy will be measured using the Physical Literacy Assessment for Youth (PLAY) tools.

    This presentation will share details on the importance of physical literacy development in children and youth, the process of creating a physical literacy enhanced community, and preliminary results from participating communities. The focus will be on children’s physical literacy levels at baseline, and how we anticipate changes in physical literacy throughout the intervention.

    This home, school, and community approach shares the way in which physical activity and physical literacy can be enhanced by taking a shared responsibility approach. Through this approach, we are hopeful to enhance physical activity levels and physical literacy experiences.

  • Oct. 3, 2019 | 3:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.
    Tell It Like It Is: Engaging and Innovative Comprehensive Sexuality Education for People with Developmental Disabilities, and Those Who Support Them
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    Oct. 3, 2019 | 3:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.

    Tell It Like It Is: Engaging and Innovative Comprehensive Sexuality Education for People with Developmental Disabilities, and Those Who Support Them

    Natalya Mason, Dallas Tetarenko, and Kristyn White

    Sexuality is an integral part of being human, and is a complex set of personal and social experiences that are not just about biology. Sexual health is a key component of overall health and well-being, and a human right. There is a pervasive idea that individuals with developmental disabilities are incapable of expressing themselves sexually, understanding desire, or fostering intimate relationships. This presentation discusses the emergence of the aforementioned attitudes, the impact it has on our communities, and introduces Tell It Like It Is, a partnership initiative between Creative Options Regina, Inclusion Saskatchewan, and Saskatoon Sexual Health, which empowers people with developmental disabilities to make informed choices about their health, sexuality, and relationships.

  • Oct. 3, 2019 | 3:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.
    Canada’s Food Guide-What’s All the Hype About?
    Learn More
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 3:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.

    Canada’s Food Guide-What’s All the Hype About?

    Sara Langley and Cassie McVay

    Abstract: An interactive session that will dig into Canada’s Food Guide: what’s new, the evidence that informed the revisions, how it can be used, and what is still to come. Learn how to use the food guide in your practice, how to adapt for certain client populations, and how it can be a tool for advocacy. You’ll leave this session with some practical tips to incorporate the food guide as a tool for teaching nutrition to different populations, in different ways!

  • Oct. 3, 2019 | 3:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.
    Contraception for Adolescents
    Learn More
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 3:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.

    Contraception for Adolescents

    Dr. Melissa Mirosh

    Abstract: This session will cover current contraceptive options available in Canada, with an emphasis on the newer items and methods that are more suited for use in adolescent and young adult populations. We will review the most current recommendations for Intrauterine Device (IUD) use. Finally, an update will be provided on emergency contraception methods and options for use in Canada.

  • Oct. 3, 2019 | 3:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.
    Primary and Secondary Prevention Strategies in Pediatric Type 2 Diabetes
    Learn More
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 3:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.
    (20 minute session as part of series of 4 sessions)

    (Medical Stream)

    Primary and Secondary Prevention Strategies in Pediatric Type 2 Diabetes

    Dr. Mark Inman

    Abstract: Pediatric type 2 diabetes is becoming an increasingly recognized entity nationwide, moving from an almost unheard of entity 20 years ago to becoming upwards of 50% of the current pediatric diabetes burden in some provinces. In Saskatchewan (and Manitoba), a disproportionate prevalence and incidence rate for pediatric type 2 diabetes can be found, in comparison to other Canadian provinces. As pediatric type 2 diabetes, in comparison to type 1 diabetes, is associated with a higher comorbidity burden at diagnosis and a shorter time to complication development post diagnosis, there is a great need to identify primary prevention strategies, implement timely screening practices for early intervention, and refine secondary prevention strategies to arrest disease progression. The aim of this session is to bring attention to primary and secondary prevention strategies as well as practical recommendations for screening and early diagnosis.

    Learning Objectives:
    By the end of this presentation, the audience members will be able to:

    • Describe primary prevention strategies for pediatric type 2 diabetes.
    • Support and advocate for primary prevention strategies in their communities.
    • Describe secondary prevention strategies for pediatric type 2 diabetes and ways to incorporate these strategies in their communities.

  • Oct. 3, 2019 | 3:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.
    Saskatchewan’s TREKK Roadshow: A novel approach to dissemination critical PEM resources to rural healthcare practitioners
    Learn More
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 3:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.
    (20 minute session as part of series of 4 sessions)

    (Medical Stream)

    Saskatchewan’s TREKK Roadshow: A novel approach to dissemination critical PEM resources to rural healthcare practitioners

    Dr. Seyara Shwetz

    Translating Emergency Knowledge for Kids (TREKK) aims to ensure every child receives the highest standard of care when they require emergency medical treatment. Upon recognizing that 85% of Canada’s children present for care at rural, remote, or general emergency departments, TREKK developed numerous comprehensive, user-friendly resources that summarize the latest evidence and best practices in Pediatric Emergency Medicine.

    The TREKK Saskatchewan Roadshow is a collaboration co-led by the Children’s Emergency Services Division of the Department of Pediatrics and the Department of Emergency Medicine. The Roadshow is a novel, hands-on approach dedicated to disseminating the TREKK content to Saskatchewan’s rural and remote healthcare practitioners. Developed to meet the needs of physicians and nurses who treat acutely unwell children, the Saskatchewan TREKK Roadshow uses a multi-disciplinary approach to deliver didactic lecture, procedural rounds, and simulated cases during the day-long session.

    Current feedback strongly suggests the Saskatchewan TREKK Roadshow is a relevant, high-yield learning experience for rural physicians and nurses. Qualitative assessment of participant feedback suggests the combination of simulation and didactic teaching results in early practical adaptation of new treatment regimes. Delivery of the content through a multi-disciplinary team is well-received by the rural and regional centres; recognizing the strengths of different healthcare practitioners promotes safe distribution of tasks during simulated cases and improved critical resource management.

    Future direction aims to accurately measure the long-term impact of the Roadshow. In addition, the Saskatchewan TREKK Roadshow intends to expand content to meet the needs of other healthcare professionals who treat critically unwell children, including respiratory therapists and paramedics. The Saskatchewan TREKK Roadshow has the potential to enhance the evidence-based, standardized care provided to critically unwell children in the province’s emergency departments by utilizing the tools carefully developed by TREKK’s pediatric emergency medicine specialists and researchers.

    Learning Objectives:
    At the end of the session, participants should be able to:

    • Recognize the vision driving Translating Emergency Knowledge for Kids (TREKK) and the importance of the content developed by the collaborative’s pediatric emergency medicine specialists and researchers.
    • Describe a novel, multidisciplinary approach to disseminating evidence-based literature and treatment algorithms in regional and remote areas of Saskatchewan.
    • Reflect on how the Roadshow might enhance medical care provided to children presenting to Saskatchewan’s emergency departments for acute medical care.
    • Identify areas of potential future research and development for the Saskatchewan TREKK Roadshow.

  • Oct. 3, 2019 | 3:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.
    Saskatchewan Prenatal Screening for Aneuploidy and Open Neural Tube Defects
    Learn More
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 3:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.
    (30 minute session as part of series of 4 sessions)

    (Medical Stream)

    Saskatchewan Prenatal Screening for Aneuploidy and Open Neural Tube Defects

    Dr. Jeff Eichhorst

    Abstract: Prenatal screening is a test or combination of tests available to all pregnant women. It is intended to identify women with an increased risk of having a fetus with certain congenital malformations or chromosomal abnormalities. The screening program can evaluate the risk of the fetus having Trisomy 21 (Down syndrome), Trisomy 18 or an open neural tube defect.

    Women with pregnancies identified as higher risk for these anomalies can then be offered a diagnostic test.

    Screening tests are intended to be offered to the entire population for the purpose of detecting those at increased risk of having a disease. Such tests are only intended to, and only can, determine what the chance is that a particular disease is present. Increased risk does not mean the presence of disease. It is not possible to have a positive or negative result from a screening test.

    The current program as well as future directions will be discussed.

    Learning Objectives:
    At the end of the session, participants should be able to:

    • Explain the testing requirements, limitations and the utility of screening for aneuploidy and open neural tube defects using serum biomarkers and ultrasound data.
    • Recall current trends of isolating fetal DNA in maternal serum and using molecular genetic techniques for a more reliable assessment of fetal health.

  • Oct. 3, 2019 | 3:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.
    Caring for Women* Who Use Substances in Pregnancy and Their Infants: Recognizing the Structural and Socioeconomic Factors That Impact Women* and Families and Interventions to Improve Mother-Infant Outcomes
    Learn More
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 3:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.
    (20 minute session as part of series of 4 sessions)

    Caring for Women* Who Use Substances in Pregnancy and Their Infants: Recognizing the Structural and Socioeconomic Factors That Impact Women* and Families and Interventions to Improve Mother-Infant Outcomes

    *We recognize that not all people who are pregnant identify as women and the importance of using the preferred pronouns of our clients
    Dr. Kali Gartner and Dr. Cassie Pancyr

    Abstract: Substance use by women in pregnancy is difficult to estimate due to stigma and judgement experienced by people who use substances, especially people who use illegal drugs in pregnancy. The Public Health Agency of Canada identifies substance use in pregnancy (e.g., alcohol, tobacco, opioids, stimulants) as a concern that impacts people across all socioeconomic demographics. However, the co-occurrence of substance use, poverty, racism, and violence often have devastating impacts for women, their infants, and families. Women who use substances in pregnancy may fear accessing medical and social services due to past experiences of violence, stigma, and especially the fear of child apprehension due to disclosure of their substance use. This can lead to avoidance of medical and prenatal care and delay access to Addiction and Mental Health Services. The literature suggests that harm reduction, patient and family centered, low barrier, and holistic services are required to meet the socioeconomic needs of women. These services can be integrated within prenatal care in a primary care setting. This presentation will aim to describe the structural and socioeconomic factors that impact many women with substance use in pregnancy. We will describe best practice guidelines and Canadian examples for care for women in the prenatal period and mother-infant-families in the postpartum period and beyond. We will describe the evidence for mother-infant dyad care in hospital, including the evidence for the “Eat, Sleep, Console” approach to monitoring neonatal opioid withdrawal in hospital. Saskatchewan has led the way in developing innovative, trauma-informed programming to support mother-infant togetherness for women impacted by substance use and trauma in pregnancy. The Sanctum 1.5 model of mother-infant care will be described, including some early data describing the impact of this new “made in Saskatchewan” approach to caring for families.

    Learning Objectives:
    At the end of the session, participants should be able to:

    • Recognize the complexities of why women may use substances in pregnancy.
    • Recognize the value of non-judgemental, compassionate, low-barrier care in improving health outcomes for women and their infants.
    • Describe the outcomes of a novel harm reduction community-based prenatal and postnatal home in Saskatchewan called Sanctum 1.5 with regards to prevention of HIV perinatal transmission, prevention of hospital child apprehension, and management of Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome in a non-acute care setting.

  • Oct. 3, 2019 | 3:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.
    Let’s Talk Syphilis – Mom and Baby
    Learn More
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 3:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.

    Let’s Talk Syphilis – Mom and Baby

    Janice Seebach and Dr. Johnmark Opondo

    Abstract: Rates of sexually transmitted infections (STIs), including gonorrhea and syphilis, are on the rise in Saskatchewan. Saskatoon declared an outbreak on March 7, 2014 and continues to be in outbreak status as incidence rates continue to rise on a yearly basis. Pregnancy is an important time to screen for all sexually transmitted blood-borne infections (STBBIs) and the appropriate management of a pregnant woman with infectious syphilis, including early treatment of her baby helps prevent serious adverse consequences. We will discuss the epidemiology of STIs, screening tests, interpretation of test results, and the management of cases and contacts of infectious syphilis. We will further explore why STIs remain an important risk to fetal, newborn, and infant health; how the population health practices of routine screening, and enhanced screening during critical times, are important key interventions; and how treatment during pregnancy and pre-conception are preferred options than waiting to manage newborn cases. This workshop is targeted towards healthcare providers who assist with STBBI cases or contacts follow-up and community members who assist in outreach activities to support clients to engage in healthcare.

  • Oct. 4, 2019 | 8:30 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.
    Caught Between Two Worlds: Newcomer Youth Overcome Challenges to Embrace Life!
    Learn More
    Oct. 4, 2019 | 8:30 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.

    Caught Between Two Worlds: Newcomer Youth Overcome Challenges to Embrace Life!

    Anita Orgurlu

    Abstract: Newcomer youth face immense challenges in navigating and integrating into their new host culture. Culture shock, language barriers, social media bullying, and xenophobia, to name a few, often leave them caught between two worlds. On the one hand, they seek to maintain a strong connection with their family and cultural heritage, and on the other, they want to cultivate a sense of inclusion and belonging to Canada and the youth culture found here. Most newcomers are successful on this journey; however, some youth are particularly vulnerable to delinquency and gangs due to a sense of isolation, boredom, peer pressure, unemployment, and poverty. At this conjuncture, it is crucial to discuss these challenges and the programs that exist to cultivate a sense of empowerment and community engagement with newcomer youth to prevent disengagement and potential mental health issues. One such program is the peer-led outreach program that has been a part of the Settlement Support Workers in Schools’ (SSWIS) activities in Saskatoon for over 10 years. This program is funded by IRCC and is a partnership between settlement service providers and the K-12 school system to support school-related settlement of newcomer family members. Motivated peer leaders facilitate peer-to-peer (youth-to-youth) support for newly arrived immigrant youth while developing their own interpersonal and leadership skills. They help other newcomers; thus they help and evolve themselves in the process. Highlighting the program’s cross-empowerment results, this presentation will discuss the proven success of peer-led activities and practices in Saskatoon schools, as well as ideas for further expansion and development of the program to maximize its benefits for the newcomer youth community.

  • Oct. 4, 2019 | 8:30 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.
    Use It or Lose It: Mobilizing Knowledge to Improve Health
    Learn More
    Oct. 4, 2019 | 8:30 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.

    Use It or Lose It: Mobilizing Knowledge to Improve Health

    Erin Beckwell

    Using a variety of learning strategies, this workshop will focus on fostering an understanding of the importance of knowledge exchange (KE) processes and products. By discussing KE frameworks, tools, and practice examples, participants will acquire practical skills to support them to use evidence and health information to influence policy, practice, and behaviour. To directly apply the workshop content to participants’ work or community context, each participant is asked to bring at least one practice example to work with during the session. A sample could be a resource or other product they have developed or are developing (e.g., handout, poster, infographic, curriculum, brochure), a communication or community engagement need or challenge, or data they need to use or share with community partners, families, service providers, etc. Participants will leave the workshop with concrete ideas and plans for advancing knowledge exchange in their individual practice, organization, and/or community.

  • Oct. 4, 2019 | 8:30 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.
    Knowledge Exchange in Action Through Facilitation
    Learn More
    Oct. 4, 2019 | 8:30 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.

    Knowledge Exchange in Action Through Facilitation

    Tanis Shanks and Connie Herman

    Abstract: Facilitation is the idea that people learn, change, and gain new perspectives, more from the process of working through problems and finding solutions than from being given the answers. When we practice facilitation, learning happens through exploration and knowledge is exchanged between all participants. The practice of facilitation dispels the myths that service providers need to be content experts or fix other people’s problems. For example, a thoughtful question can help a person gain further insight into a challenge they face more than simply giving people verbal or written information. During this 90- minute interactive workshop, the presenters will use strategies and tools to help service providers understand the importance of the experiential learning process with groups and individuals. When we use facilitation in combination with health-promoting resources, those resources become more meaningful and have a greater impact. The presenters will demonstrate how to use a variety of health-promoting resources as a way to create knowledge exchange in action. Participants in this workshop will be asked to take part in small and large group discussions.

  • Oct. 4, 2019 | 8:30 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.
    Building Research Relationships with Indigenous Communities
    Learn More
    Oct. 4, 2019 | 8:30 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.

    Building Research Relationships with Indigenous Communities

    Moses Gordon, John Carriere, and Cheyanne Desnomie

    Abstract: The Saskatchewan Centre for Patient-Oriented Research (SCPOR) works closely with the Indigenous Peoples’ Health Research Centre (IPHRC), a collaborative partnership that is demonstrated most clearly with the Indigenous Research and Engagement Expertise (IREE) Platform – an important component within SCPOR that is filled and led by IPHRC.

    One of the main supports given to research teams by the IREE Platform are regularly-offered training modules on Building Research Relationships with Indigenous Communities (BRRIC). These modules are offered in half day sessions open to individuals and organizations seeking to engage Indigenous communities in research. The modules provide participants with practical skills for engaging in transformative and community-based research with Indigenous communities. BRRIC training sessions have been exceptionally popular and in demand, a fact highlighting the need for continuing capacity development for researchers and healthcare practitioners in Saskatchewan.

    This breakout session will revolve around the BRRIC module itself, offering the audience training and guidance on: i) the history of Indigenous health and research in Saskatchewan; ii) existing policies and frameworks regulating research with Indigenous communities; and iii) protocol and tips on how to respectfully and meaningfully engage Indigenous communities in research. Upon the conclusion of this session, attendees will be better equipped for engaging in research with Indigenous communities utilizing a reciprocal methodological approach that benefits all parties involved.

  • Oct. 4, 2019 | 8:30 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.
    Supporting young children with FASD in Aboriginal Head Start Centres: Teachings from the Canadian FASD Mentoring Project
    Learn More
    Oct. 4, 2019 | 8:30 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.

    Supporting young children with FASD in Aboriginal Head Start Centres: Teachings from the Canadian FASD Mentoring Project

    Bev Drew

    Description: In this session, participants will hear about the Canadian FASD Mentoring Project which has provided FASD workshops to Aboriginal Head Start sites in Urban and Northern locations across Canada. Some of the workshop material developed for the project will be presented. Best-practice approaches to providing services will be discussed. Participants will actively participate in defining typical strengths and challenges of young children with FASD, and determining strategies and environmental adaptations that can support success.

    Session Objectives:

    • Discuss the Canadian FASD Mentoring Project
    • Discuss best approaches for working with young children and their families
    • Define and discuss typical strengths and challenges of young children with FASD
    • Discuss strategies and environmental adaptations that can support success of young children with FASD in early learning environments

  • Oct. 4, 2019 | 10:20 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.
    Closing Remarks
    Learn More
    Oct. 4, 2019 | 10:20 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.

    Closing Remarks

  • Oct. 4, 2019 | 10:30 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.
    Childhood Anxiety: Worried About Worrying
    Learn More
    Oct. 4, 2019 | 10:30 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

    Childhood Anxiety: Worried About Worrying

    Dr. Madhav Sarda

    All children worry. Anxiety can be helpful and necessary. For some children, though, it’s a heavy weight to bear that changes how they interact with other people and the world. It keeps them in their home and out of school. It can lead to anger and aggression. It can even increase the risk of suicide and self-harm. This session will go through how childhood anxiety starts and develops over time, as well as how it presents at different ages. We will discuss different ways anxiety can show itself and how it can mask itself behind different behaviours or presentations. We will explore common factors that link all different types of anxiety, how we can recognize when anxiety is interfering, and how we can support children struggling with it. The focus will be on basic approaches and techniques that parents and all frontline professionals can use with anxious children to help improve their function and quality of life.

Hotels and Parking Information

HOLIDAY INN DOWNTOWN
  • 101 Pacific Ave.
    Saskatoon, SK S7K 1N8
  • 1877-654-0228
Guest rooms effective:
Check-in October 1, 2019 | Check-out October 4, 2019
Book rooms by September 2, 2019 to receive special rate.

Group name:
Prevention Matters Conference

  • $159.00 per night (KING plus sleeper sofa)
  • $159.00 per night (Two Standard Queen)

Both room types have additional tax and parking. There is a $10 charge for additional adult in the room.

HILTON GARDEN INN
  • 90- 22nd Street East
    Saskatoon, SK S7K 3X6
  • 306-244-2311
Guest rooms effective:
Check-in October 1, 2019 | Check-out October 4, 2019
Book rooms by September 1, 2019 to receive the special rate.

Group name:
Prevention Matters

Group code: #PMC213

  • $124.00 per night (plus taxes and parking)

HOLIDAY INN EXPRESS
  • 315 Idylwyld North
    Saskatoon, SK S7L 0Z1
  • 306-384-8830
  • 1-877-654-0228
Guest rooms effective:
Check-in October 1, 2019 | Check-out October 4, 2019
Book rooms by September 4, 2019 to receive special rate.

Group name:
Prevention Matters Group

  • $129.00 per night (Two Queen) (plus taxes)

Free parking and breakfast.

Midtown Plaza Parkade

Parking Rate: $2.00/hr or $12.00/daily

Parking Locations:

  • North Surface Parking (Across from TCU and Hudson’s Bay)

    Entrances at 23rd St. E, 22nd St. E, and Pacific Ave.

  • South Surface Parking (By Toys R’ Us)

    Entrances at 20th St. E, and 1st Ave.

  • Underground Parking

    Access through North and South Surface Entrances

Payment Method:

  • Express Pay Stations accept credit, debit, tap and cash
  • Lot exits take credit and debit only

Downtown FlexParking

Parking Rate: $2.00/hr from 9:00 am to 6:00 pm

Payment Method:

Medical Stream

This year we are trying something new to better meet the needs of healthcare professionals!

We are hosting a one-day Medical Stream within the overall Prevention Matters Conference. The Medical Stream has been guided by a physician planning committee. This stream fits with the overall themes of the conference and is open to all conference participants, but is designed specifically to meet the needs of physicians and other healthcare providers in Saskatchewan.

As usual, the Prevention Matters Conference will address primary and secondary prevention of many factors that impact the health and well-being of children, expectant parents, and families in Saskatchewan. You may choose to attend the entire conference, or just the one-day Medical Stream.

This Group Learning program has been certified by the College of Family Physicians of Canada and the Saskatchewan Chapter for up to 6 Mainpro+ credits.

This event is an Accredited Group Learning Activity (Section 1) as defined by the Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada and accredited by the Division of Continuing Medical Education, College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan for up to 6.0 MOC credit hours.

Medical Stream Learning Objectives

As a result of attending the Medical Stream, participants will be able to:

  • Enhance their clinical capacity in the prevention and early detection of common primary care medical problems in prenatal and/or child populations
  • Describe strategies to engage patients and families in prevention practices for child health
  • Recognize the complexities of the interaction of social determinants of health and their impact upon health outcomes
  • Use knowledge exchange (KE) to strengthen healthcare practice and improve child health in Saskatchewan

You are invited to attend the entire conference, or just the one-day Medical Stream. *Student rate of $100 is available for Medical Stream upon request.

Please note: We are in the process of applying for Continuing Medical Education (CME) accreditation for the Medical Stream of this conference.

Medical Stream Speakers

  • Erin Beckwell
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 8:45 a.m. – 9:45 a.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Mobilizing Knowledge for More Accessible and Effective Patient Care


    Erin is a social worker who has spent her career working in the areas of health, education, and community development. In her current role as Knowledge Translation Specialist with the Saskatchewan Health Authority, Erin’s work focuses on mobilizing knowledge to support the health system to achieve health equity and provide culturally safe care for all.

    Originally from Treaty 4 Territory in Southwest Saskatchewan, she has called Treaty 6 Territory & Homeland of the Métis (Saskatoon, SK) home for over 20 years.

  • Dr. Mahli Brindamour
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 1:45 p.m. – 2:45 p.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Food Insecurity: Multiple Perspectives to Understand the Issue


    Mahli Brindamour provides care to mothers and infants cared for at Sanctum 1.5 prenatal and postnatal home for women at risk of HIV exposure in pregnancy, HIV positive, or at risk of child apprehension. Sanctum 1.5 is leading innovative practice by ensuring trauma informed care for women before their infants are born and then continuity of mother-infant care after delivery. Infants are discharged from the hospital in the care of their mothers with supervision from staff. Sanctum 1.5 also provides monitoring for neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) and is piloting the assessment and treatment of NAS in a community setting with pediatric oversight, which is a novel approach not yet developed elsewhere.

  • Dr. Jeff Eichhorst
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 3:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Saskatchewan Prenatal Screening for Aneuploidy and Open Neural Tube Defects


    Dr. Jeff Eichhorst holds a Certificate in Laboratory Technology and Bachelor’s Degree in Biochemistry from the University of Regina and a PhD in Pathology and Laboratory Medicine from the University of Saskatchewan. He has over 35 years’ experience in clinical analytical laboratory testing.

    His main area of research and interest has been in both clinical and forensic toxicology as well as clinical analyses using tandem mass spectrometry. He helped develop and implement expanded newborn screening testing in Saskatchewan and has worked in developing other provincial screening programs such as maternal serum screening and colorectal cancer screening. He has many peer reviewed publications, invited presentations and abstract presentations at both national and international conferences in the USA and Europe. He has trained and mentored many undergraduate and graduate students as part of their laboratory training. He currently serves as a clinical biochemist for the Saskatchewan Health Authority at the Roy Romanow Provincial Laboratory in Regina, SK.

  • Dr. Kali Gartner
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 3:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Caring for Women* Who Use Substances in Pregnancy and Their Infants: Recognizing the Structural and Socioeconomic Factors That Impact Women* and Families and Interventions to Improve Mother-Infant Outcomes

    *We recognize that not all people who are pregnant identify as women and the importance of using the preferred pronouns of our clients

    Kali Gartner is a family physician living in Saskatoon, SK, Treaty 6 Territory and the Homeland of the Metis Nation. She attended the U of S College of Medicine then moved to Vancouver, BC for Family Medicine Residency and Enhanced Skills Training in HIV/AIDS and Addiction Medicine. Dr. Gartner worked for two years with Sheway and FIR Square Unit at BC Women’s Hospital providing primary care, prenatal care, and follow-up with a pregnancy outreach program caring for women in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside impacted by trauma, violence, and substance use. She also worked with the Maxxine Wright Health Centre which is a similar program in Surrey, BC. She is now thankful to be back home working with the Saskatoon Community Clinic and Westside Community Clinic. Families accessing care at Westside Community Clinic are disproportionately impacted by effects of colonization, intergenerational trauma, and poverty. Integrated prenatal, medical, obstetrical, mental health, and addiction care is provided at the Westside Community Clinic in partnership with community organizations, Saskatchewan Health Authority, visiting medical specialists, and a holistic interdisciplinary team.

  • Dr. Mark Inman
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 3:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Primary and Secondary Prevention Strategies in Pediatric Type 2 Diabetes


    Dr. Mark Inman is a Pediatric Endocrinologist affiliated with the University of Saskatchewan College of Medicine and works with the LiveWell Pediatric Diabetes Program at Royal University Hospital in Saskatoon. His clinical work involves both type 1 and type 2 diabetes as well as an array of pediatric endocrine disorders.

  • Dr. Noni MacDonald
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 11:00 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Optimizing Vaccine Uptake – Addressing Vaccine Hesitancy


    Noni MacDonald is a Professor of Paediatrics (Infectious Diseases) at Dalhousie University and the IWK Health Centre in Halifax, Nova Scotia. She is a former Dean of Medicine at Dalhousie University and was the first woman in Canada to be a Dean of Medicine. Her two current major areas of interest involve global health. The first is vaccines including vaccine safety, hesitancy, demand, pain mitigation, education and policy, especially through her work with the World Health Organization (WHO). She has been a member of SAGE (the Strategic Advisory Group of Experts on immunization for WHO) since 2017. This committee provides advice to the WHO on all aspects of vaccinology. She also chairs the WHO Decade of Vaccine assessment committee that has been charged with reviewing the progress (or lack thereof) on the Global Vaccine Action Plan (GVAP) goals as a precursor for development of the next Decade of Vaccines plan. The second area is MicroResearch - building capacity in community focused research in developing countries and now also in Canada (www.microresearch-international.ca) to help interdisciplinary health professionals find local solutions for community health problems that fit the context, culture, and resources. She is a Founder and Co-Director of the Centre for MicroResearch International.

    Dr. MacDonald has published over 400 papers; was the founding Editor-in-Chief of Paediatrics & Child Health for over 20 years, and a former Editor-in-Chief of CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). She is the Editor for Child Health for new Oxford University Press publication Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Global Public Health. Dr. MacDonald has long been recognized in Canada and internationally, as an advocate for child and youth health and as a leader in paediatric infectious diseases and global health.

  • Dr. Cassie Pancyr
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 3:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Caring for Women* Who Use Substances in Pregnancy and Their Infants: Recognizing the Structural and Socioeconomic Factors That Impact Women* and Families and Interventions to Improve Mother-Infant Outcomes

    *We recognize that not all people who are pregnant identify as women and the importance of using the preferred pronouns of our clients

    Dr. Cassie Pancyr provide primary care and prenatal care to women and their infants at the Westside Community Clinic. Some women who access care at Westside Community Clinic are impacted by effects of colonization, intergenerational trauma, and poverty. Integrated prenatal, medical, obstrical, mental health, and addiction care is provided at the Westside Community Clinic in partnership with community organizations, Saskatchewan Health Authority, visiting medical specialists, and a holistic interdisciplinary team.

  • Dr. Seyara Shwetz
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 3:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Saskatchewan’s TREKK Roadshow: A novel approach to dissemination critical PEM resources to rural healthcare practitioners


    Dr. Sey Shwetz is in her fourth year of residency training, pursuing dual certification in Emergency Medicine at the University of Saskatchewan and Pediatric Emergency Medicine at the University of Alberta. Her interests include pre-hospital medicine and maximizing outcomes for pediatric patients in rural and remote areas. She is a keen wellness champion and an active leader in the resident physician community, currently acting as the Board Chair for Resident Doctors of Canada.

  • Dr. Stuart Skinner
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 9:45 a.m. – 10:45 a.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    A Combined Response to Address Health Gaps in Indigenous Communities


    Dr. Stuart Skinner received his medical degree from the University of Saskatchewan in 2002. He also holds a Diploma in Tropical Medicine and Hygiene from the Gorgas Institute at the University of Alabama (2002), and a Diploma in Tropical Medicine and Hygiene from the University of Peru (2005). Dr. Skinner is a Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians of Canada (2006), and holds a Certificate of Special Competence in Infectious Diseases (2007). He is an Assistant Professor at the University of Saskatchewan. Currently Dr. Skinner works as an Infectious Disease Specialist at the Regina Infectious Diseases Clinic, as well as traveling to several locations in Saskatchewan to provide Infections Disease clinics. In addition Dr. Skinner has been instrumental in designing the Wellness Wheel, which is a community led, multi-disciplinary and integrated approach to health care disparities affecting First Nation communities.

  • Dr. Valerie Tarasuk
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 1:45 p.m. – 2:45 p.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Food Insecurity: Multiple Perspectives to Understand the Issue


    Valerie Tarasuk is a Professor in the Department of Nutritional Sciences at the University of Toronto, where she has been on faculty since 1994. The primary focus of her research is household food insecurity. She has led several tri-council research grants to elucidate the scope, nature, and health implications of this problem in Canada, assess the effectiveness of community responses, and determine how public policies and programs impact food insecurity prevalence and severity. In 2011, she led the establishment of PROOF, an interdisciplinary research program designed to identify effective policy approaches to reduce household food insecurity in Canada. In 2018, she received an honorary doctorate from Queen’s University in recognition of her work.

  • Dr. Cassandra Opikokew Wajuntah
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 1:45 p.m. – 2:45 p.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Food Insecurity: Multiple Perspectives to Understand the Issue


    Cassandra is a member of Canoe Lake Cree First Nation and was raised in Meadow Lake in Northern Saskatchewan. She graduated at the top of her class in 2009 from the University of Regina with a Bachelor of Arts in Journalism (BAJ, Certificate in Indigenous Communication Arts (INCA) and a Master's of Public Administration (MPA). As a PhD candidate in public policy, she was the recipient of a CIHR Doctoral Research Award ($108,000) for her dissertation entitled The Indian Solution to the Policy Problem: Developing an Indigenous Policymaking Model to Address First Nations Health Disparities. She is working with Indigenous health organizations in Saskatchewan and Hawai’i to examine how self-determined Indigenous health policymaking models are more effective at improving the health of Indigenous people than Western colonial models. Professionally, she is currently Director of the Indigenous Peoples’ Health Research Centre (IPHRC) and was recently a Visiting Scholar at the U of Hawai’i's John A. Burns School of Medicine in the Department of Native Hawaiian Health. She currently resides in Fort Qu’Appelle, SK with her husband Justin, a member of Standing Buffalo Dakota First Nation, their 6 dogs and their 3 wild toddlers.

Medical Stream Abstracts

  • Oct. 3, 2019 | 8:45 a.m. – 9:45 a.m.
    Mobilizing Knowledge for More Accessible and Effective Patient Care
    Learn More
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 8:45 a.m. – 9:45 a.m.

    (Medical Stream)

    Mobilizing Knowledge for More Accessible and Effective Patient Care

    Erin Beckwell

    Abstract: Using a variety of learning strategies, this workshop will focus on providing physicians with an understanding of the importance of knowledge exchange (KE) processes and products in patient care. By discussing KE principles and practice examples, participants will acquire practical skills to support them to use evidence and health information to provide more responsive, accessible, and effective health information to patients and families. To directly apply the workshop content to participants’ practice contexts, each participant is asked to bring at least one practice example to work with during the session, such as patient education material or other product used to communicate health information (poster, infographic, curriculum, brochure, etc.) in their practice, a patient communication need or challenge, or data they wish to share patients, families, or health care teams. Participants will leave the workshop with a basic understanding of KE tools and plans for applying KE principles in their practice setting.

    Learning Objectives:
    By the end of this presentation, the audience should be able to:

    • Describe the principles of knowledge exchange as they apply in patient and family health care settings.
    • Identify opportunities for applying knowledge translation and exchange tools and strategies within their practice setting(s).

  • Oct. 3, 2019 | 9:45 a.m. – 10:45 a.m.
    A Combined Response to Address Health Gaps in Indigenous Communities
    Learn More
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 9:45 a.m. – 10:45 a.m.

    (Medical Stream)

    A Combined Response to Address Health Gaps in Indigenous Communities

    Dr. Stuart Skinner

    Abstract: Indigenous peoples are over-represented in Saskatchewan in regards to rates of many chronic diseases, including HIV, hepatitis C and diabetes, and they have poorer outcomes when living with chronic disease. Further, significant barriers to care exist for those living in Indigenous communities that contribute to these rates and outcomes. Despite these disparities, current health services are not focused upon or dedicated to address the unique health challenges for those individuals with chronic disease living on-reserve. Moreover, communities are often not consulted and are left out of conversations around health care systems and delivery that affect health. Unique models of health care delivery, led by community, are required to address these health disparities. The Wellness Wheel is a unique team of health providers and researchers that works closely in partnership with community to provide a combination of Western and Indigenous medicine to reduce disparities, engage patients and communities, to improve access to care and outcomes. This talk will discuss this unique program, its partnerships, and a potential way forward.

    Learning Objectives:
    At the end of the session, attendees will be able to:

    • Describe the current health disparities and challenges for Indigenous peoples living on-reserve in Saskatchewan.
    • Describe the Wellness Wheel and its use to develop partnerships between providers and communities for chronic disease for Indigenous peoples.
    • Discuss opportunities to build on, adapt and expand this model of care for Indigenous peoples.

  • Oct. 3, 2019 | 11:00 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.
    Optimizing Vaccine Uptake – Addressing Vaccine Hesitancy
    Learn More
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 11:00 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.

    Optimizing Vaccine Uptake – Addressing Vaccine Hesitancy

    Dr. Noni MacDonald

    Learning Objectives:
    By the end of this presentation, the audience should be able to:

    • Define vaccine hesitancy and the continuum from acceptance to refusal.
    • List factors that contribute to hesitancy in different contexts with different vaccines.
    • Outline evidence informed strategies for addressing hesitancy and improving vaccine uptake at the program and patient levels.
    • Describe key factors (and pitfalls) in developing immunization program and patient communication strategies.
    • Describe key elements of risk communication.
    • Identify why supporting vaccine acceptance resiliency is important and identify the role of diverse providers, from clinicians to community support workers, in this support.

  • Oct. 3, 2019 | 1:15 p.m. – 1:45 p.m.
    Food Insecurity in Canada: The Case for Evidence-Based Policy
    Learn More
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 1:15 p.m. – 1:45 p.m.

    Food Insecurity in Canada: The Case for Evidence-Based Policy

    Dr. Valerie Tarasuk

    Abstract: Household food insecurity, the inadequate or insecure food access due to financial constraints, is a serious problem in Canada. A recent analysis of Canadian Community Health Survey data from the ten provinces indicates that 13.8% of households were food insecure, and 19.1% of children under the age of 18 lived in food insecure families in 2017. Rates in the territories will likely be even higher, when the data become available. With 25 years of population-level measurement and monitoring in Canada, the social epidemiology of food insecurity has been well charted, as have its health implications. In Canada, food insecurity is associated with heightened nutritional vulnerability, increased risk of physical and mental health problems, poorer management of chronic conditions, higher mortality rates, and higher health care costs. With this evidence has come a growing recognition of the need for more effective responses to address food insecurity, but we have yet to see public policy interventions explicitly designed to impact this outcome. Nonetheless, reductions in the prevalence and severity of food insecurity have been observed following federal and provincial interventions that have improved the financial circumstances of very low income households. These research findings highlight the power of public policy decisions to shape households’ food security and point to promising directions for future policy reforms.

    Learning Objectives:
    By the end of this presentation, the audience should be able to:

    • Describe the scope and nature of household food insecurity in Canada.
    • Describe the health implications associated with food insecurity in Canada.
    • Apply an awareness of food insecurity when assessing public policy decisions.

  • Oct. 3, 2019 | 1:45 p.m. – 2:45 p.m.
    Food Insecurity: Multiple Perspectives to Understand the Issue
    Learn More
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 1:45 p.m. – 2:45 p.m.

    Food Insecurity: Multiple Perspectives to Understand the Issue

    Dr. Valerie Tarasuk, Dr. Cassandra Opikokew Wajuntah, and Dr. Mahli Brindamour

    The panel aims to bring diverse perspectives to a discussion on food insecurity in Saskatchewan and Canada. Perspectives include: national understanding, current research, policy implications, Indigenous experiences, programming responses, impact on women’s mental health, impact on chronic disease, health outcomes for children, and many others.

    Learning Objectives:
    By the end of this presentation, the audience should be able to:

    • Explain the issue of food insecurity and its’ impact on health and well-being outcomes from diverse perspectives.
    • Describe local, provincial, and national responses to the issue of food insecurity.
    • Explain the role of diverse professions in addressing the issue.

  • Oct. 3, 2019 | 3:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.
    Primary and Secondary Prevention Strategies in Pediatric Type 2 Diabetes
    Learn More
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 3:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.
    (20 minute session as part of series of 4 sessions)

    (Medical Stream)

    Primary and Secondary Prevention Strategies in Pediatric Type 2 Diabetes

    Dr. Mark Inman

    Abstract: Pediatric type 2 diabetes is becoming an increasingly recognized entity nationwide, moving from an almost unheard of entity 20 years ago to becoming upwards of 50% of the current pediatric diabetes burden in some provinces. In Saskatchewan (and Manitoba), a disproportionate prevalence and incidence rate for pediatric type 2 diabetes can be found, in comparison to other Canadian provinces. As pediatric type 2 diabetes, in comparison to type 1 diabetes, is associated with a higher comorbidity burden at diagnosis and a shorter time to complication development post diagnosis, there is a great need to identify primary prevention strategies, implement timely screening practices for early intervention, and refine secondary prevention strategies to arrest disease progression. The aim of this session is to bring attention to primary and secondary prevention strategies as well as practical recommendations for screening and early diagnosis.

    Learning Objectives:
    By the end of this presentation, the audience members will be able to:

    • Describe primary prevention strategies for pediatric type 2 diabetes.
    • Support and advocate for primary prevention strategies in their communities.
    • Describe secondary prevention strategies for pediatric type 2 diabetes and ways to incorporate these strategies in their communities.

  • Oct. 3, 2019 | 3:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.
    Saskatchewan’s TREKK Roadshow: A novel approach to dissemination critical PEM resources to rural healthcare practitioners
    Learn More
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 3:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.
    (20 minute session as part of series of 4 sessions)

    (Medical Stream)

    Saskatchewan’s TREKK Roadshow: A novel approach to dissemination critical PEM resources to rural healthcare practitioners

    Dr. Seyara Shwetz

    Translating Emergency Knowledge for Kids (TREKK) aims to ensure every child receives the highest standard of care when they require emergency medical treatment. Upon recognizing that 85% of Canada’s children present for care at rural, remote, or general emergency departments, TREKK developed numerous comprehensive, user-friendly resources that summarize the latest evidence and best practices in Pediatric Emergency Medicine.

    The TREKK Saskatchewan Roadshow is a collaboration co-led by the Children’s Emergency Services Division of the Department of Pediatrics and the Department of Emergency Medicine. The Roadshow is a novel, hands-on approach dedicated to disseminating the TREKK content to Saskatchewan’s rural and remote healthcare practitioners. Developed to meet the needs of physicians and nurses who treat acutely unwell children, the Saskatchewan TREKK Roadshow uses a multi-disciplinary approach to deliver didactic lecture, procedural rounds, and simulated cases during the day-long session.

    Current feedback strongly suggests the Saskatchewan TREKK Roadshow is a relevant, high-yield learning experience for rural physicians and nurses. Qualitative assessment of participant feedback suggests the combination of simulation and didactic teaching results in early practical adaptation of new treatment regimes. Delivery of the content through a multi-disciplinary team is well-received by the rural and regional centres; recognizing the strengths of different healthcare practitioners promotes safe distribution of tasks during simulated cases and improved critical resource management.

    Future direction aims to accurately measure the long-term impact of the Roadshow. In addition, the Saskatchewan TREKK Roadshow intends to expand content to meet the needs of other healthcare professionals who treat critically unwell children, including respiratory therapists and paramedics. The Saskatchewan TREKK Roadshow has the potential to enhance the evidence-based, standardized care provided to critically unwell children in the province’s emergency departments by utilizing the tools carefully developed by TREKK’s pediatric emergency medicine specialists and researchers.

    Learning Objectives:
    At the end of the session, participants should be able to:

    • Recognize the vision driving Translating Emergency Knowledge for Kids (TREKK) and the importance of the content developed by the collaborative’s pediatric emergency medicine specialists and researchers.
    • Describe a novel, multidisciplinary approach to disseminating evidence-based literature and treatment algorithms in regional and remote areas of Saskatchewan.
    • Reflect on how the Roadshow might enhance medical care provided to children presenting to Saskatchewan’s emergency departments for acute medical care.
    • Identify areas of potential future research and development for the Saskatchewan TREKK Roadshow.

  • Oct. 3, 2019 | 3:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.
    Saskatchewan Prenatal Screening for Aneuploidy and Open Neural Tube Defects
    Learn More
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 3:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.
    (30 minute session as part of series of 4 sessions)

    (Medical Stream)

    Saskatchewan Prenatal Screening for Aneuploidy and Open Neural Tube Defects

    Dr. Jeff Eichhorst

    Abstract: Prenatal screening is a test or combination of tests available to all pregnant women. It is intended to identify women with an increased risk of having a fetus with certain congenital malformations or chromosomal abnormalities. The screening program can evaluate the risk of the fetus having Trisomy 21 (Down syndrome), Trisomy 18 or an open neural tube defect.

    Women with pregnancies identified as higher risk for these anomalies can then be offered a diagnostic test.

    Screening tests are intended to be offered to the entire population for the purpose of detecting those at increased risk of having a disease. Such tests are only intended to, and only can, determine what the chance is that a particular disease is present. Increased risk does not mean the presence of disease. It is not possible to have a positive or negative result from a screening test.

    The current program as well as future directions will be discussed.

    Learning Objectives:
    At the end of the session, participants should be able to:

    • Explain the testing requirements, limitations and the utility of screening for aneuploidy and open neural tube defects using serum biomarkers and ultrasound data.
    • Recall current trends of isolating fetal DNA in maternal serum and using molecular genetic techniques for a more reliable assessment of fetal health.

  • Oct. 3, 2019 | 3:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.
    Caring for Women* Who Use Substances in Pregnancy and Their Infants: Recognizing the Structural and Socioeconomic Factors That Impact Women* and Families and Interventions to Improve Mother-Infant Outcomes
    Learn More
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 3:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.
    (20 minute session as part of series of 4 sessions)

    Caring for Women* Who Use Substances in Pregnancy and Their Infants: Recognizing the Structural and Socioeconomic Factors That Impact Women* and Families and Interventions to Improve Mother-Infant Outcomes

    *We recognize that not all people who are pregnant identify as women and the importance of using the preferred pronouns of our clients
    Dr. Kali Gartner and Dr. Cassie Pancyr

    Abstract: Substance use by women in pregnancy is difficult to estimate due to stigma and judgement experienced by people who use substances, especially people who use illegal drugs in pregnancy. The Public Health Agency of Canada identifies substance use in pregnancy (e.g., alcohol, tobacco, opioids, stimulants) as a concern that impacts people across all socioeconomic demographics. However, the co-occurrence of substance use, poverty, racism, and violence often have devastating impacts for women, their infants, and families. Women who use substances in pregnancy may fear accessing medical and social services due to past experiences of violence, stigma, and especially the fear of child apprehension due to disclosure of their substance use. This can lead to avoidance of medical and prenatal care and delay access to Addiction and Mental Health Services. The literature suggests that harm reduction, patient and family centered, low barrier, and holistic services are required to meet the socioeconomic needs of women. These services can be integrated within prenatal care in a primary care setting. This presentation will aim to describe the structural and socioeconomic factors that impact many women with substance use in pregnancy. We will describe best practice guidelines and Canadian examples for care for women in the prenatal period and mother-infant-families in the postpartum period and beyond. We will describe the evidence for mother-infant dyad care in hospital, including the evidence for the “Eat, Sleep, Console” approach to monitoring neonatal opioid withdrawal in hospital. Saskatchewan has led the way in developing innovative, trauma-informed programming to support mother-infant togetherness for women impacted by substance use and trauma in pregnancy. The Sanctum 1.5 model of mother-infant care will be described, including some early data describing the impact of this new “made in Saskatchewan” approach to caring for families.

    Learning Objectives:
    At the end of the session, participants should be able to:

    • Recognize the complexities of why women may use substances in pregnancy.
    • Recognize the value of non-judgemental, compassionate, low-barrier care in improving health outcomes for women and their infants.
    • Describe the outcomes of a novel harm reduction community-based prenatal and postnatal home in Saskatchewan called Sanctum 1.5 with regards to prevention of HIV perinatal transmission, prevention of hospital child apprehension, and management of Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome in a non-acute care setting.

Displays

The following organizations will provide a display during the Prevention Matters Conference 2019:

  • CADTH
  • Canada Revenue Agency
  • Canadian Red Cross
  • CFS Saskatoon
  • CHEP – Good Food Box Program
  • Eat Well Saskatchewan
  • FASD Network of Saskatchewan
  • HealthLine
  • Jordan’s Principle
  • Northern Inter-Tribal Health Authority Inc. (NITHA)
  • Odin Books
  • Public Health Agency of Canada
  • Saskatchewan Advocate for Children and Youth
  • Saskatchewan Child Abuse Protocol
  • Saskatchewan Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services
  • Service Canada
  • Service Hospitality
  • Saskatchewan Prevention Institute
  • SGI
  • The Office of the Treaty Commissioner

Display set up is from 8:30 a.m. to 10:00 a.m. on Wednesday, October 2, 2019. Display take down is from 10:30 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. on Friday, October 4, 2019. For more information about the conference displays contact Cara at czukewich@skprevention.ca or 306.651.4316.

*Prevention Matters Conference is nut-free and scent-free.

THEME 1:

Role of Prevention in Health

Working upstream to benefit the health and well-being of children

THEME 2:

Knowledge Exchange for Healthy Families and Communities

Sharing knowledge in multiple directions and ways

Community-based professionals, service providers, and healthcare providers who work with children, families, and communities

Connecting and Collaborating to:

Identify and strengthen attendees’ role in prevention to achieve the best health possible for children in Saskatchewan

Highlight ways Saskatchewan healthcare and service providers are currently participating in knowledge exchange

Identify future opportunities for attendees to apply and benefit from knowledge exchange in their work

PURPOSE: Prevention Matters 2019 will focus on building connections and collaborations across disciplines and across the province, to learn from one another to address healthy child development and well-being. The conference will highlight the role of prevention in health and how knowledge exchange (sharing knowledge in multiple directions and ways) is the foundation to addressing needs and improving health.

THEME 1:

Role of Prevention in Health

Prevention Matters aims to help healthcare and service providers identify and strengthen their role in prevention to achieve the best health possible for children in Saskatchewan.

THEME 2:

Knowledge Exchange for Healthy Families and Communities

Prevention Matters aims to highlight ways Saskatchewan healthcare and service providers are currently participating in knowledge exchange and to help attendees identify future opportunities to apply and benefit from knowledge exchange in their work.

The conference will benefit community-based professionals, service providers, and healthcare providers who work with children, families, and communities. This includes Support Workers, Home Visitors, Maternal Child Health Workers, Parent Mentors, Social Workers, Educators, Early Childcare Workers, Mental Health and Addictions Counselors, Youth Workers, Adult Allies, Nurses (Public Health, Primary Care, and Practitioner), Midwives, Family Physicians, Pediatricians, Obstetricians, Medical Health Officers, and others.

  • Medical Stream

A one-day medical stream within Prevention Matters 2019 aims to address the needs of healthcare professionals, with applicable information, training, and tools to use in their practice. The medical stream will be on October 3, 2019. This stream and all of its sessions will be open to all conference attendees.

Registration

The deadline to register for Prevention Matters 2019 is September 24, 2019.

  • April 1 – June 30, 2019
  • $400
  • Early Bird Registration
  • July 1 – Sept. 24, 2019
  • $425
  • Regular Registration
  • Ends Sept. 24, 2019
  • $225
  • One Day Medical Stream

Student pricing is available. Please call 306-651-4300 for more information.

Speakers

  • Everyone
  • Concurrent Speakers
  • Keynote Speakers
  • Gina Alexander
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 3:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    A Community Safety and Well-Being Framework for Saskatchewan


    Gina Alexander is the Executive Director of Community Safety and Well-Being, Integrated Justice Services, serving both the Ministries of Justice and Attorney General and Corrections and Policing. Her responsibilities cover province-wide programs and initiatives including Victims Services, Restorative Justice Programs, Interpersonal Violence and Abuse, Hub Tables, and the Northern Alcohol Strategy. Prior to this current assignment, she was the Executive Assistant to the Deputy Minister to the Premier of Saskatchewan where she was responsible for the co-ordination and implementation of various meetings, committees, and government-wide initiatives. Between 2007 and 2015, Gina was responsible for the delivery of province-wide programs including court annexed civil and family mediation, fee for service mediation, facilitation, and training. Gina’s extensive mediation and facilitation experience includes high conflict family mediation, civil mediation, and organizational and multi-party facilitation. She has provided mediation, conflict resolution, and leadership training to thousands of participants.

  • Jill Bally
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 3:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Seeking to Improve Outcomes for Adolescents of Diverse Ethnicities Living with Undiagnosed Prediabetes and Type 2 Diabetes in Saskatchewan


    Jill Bally, RN, PhD is a registered nurse and has practiced in pediatrics for the past 22 years. Dr. Bally is an Associate Professor in the College of Nursing, University of Saskatchewan. Her doctoral studies focused on pediatric oncology and family-centered nursing care. Currently, Jill continues to develop her program of research related to the health and wellness of children and families who are affected by childhood illnesses.

  • Donna Banach
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 8:45 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Promoting Youth Engagement: Techniques, Goals, and Challenges


    Maria Soonias Ali and Donna Banach are both YAP Coordinators at the Saskatchewan Prevention Institute. As part of the Institute’s FASD team, they support the work of the overall FASD Prevention Program. In addition, both Maria and Donna travel to communities throughout Saskatchewan to provide presentations to youth and adult allies in order to increase honest and safe conversations about alcohol-related harms. The YAP Program, in collaboration with the Institute’s Sexual and Reproductive Health Program, administers Youth Health Community Grants to support youth to raise awareness about sexual health, alcohol-related harms, and harm reduction in their community. The program also develops resources for both services providers and youth; most recently these have included the two facilitator manuals discussed during this training. In 2018, Donna was hired as the Northern Youth Action for Prevention Coordinator at the Saskatchewan Prevention Institute. Based in La Ronge, this position is uniquely positioned in the office of Integrated Justice Services Community Safety and Well-Being and allows for expansion of the YAP Program in Northern Saskatchewan.

  • Erin Beckwell
    (Keynote Session)
    Oct. 2, 2019 | 3:00 –p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

    Knowledge Exchange for Healthy Families & Communities - An Interactive Event


    (Medical Stream Session)
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 8:45 a.m. – 9:45 a.m.

    Mobilizing Knowledge for More Accessible and Effective Patient Care


    (Concurrent Session)
    Oct. 4, 2019 | 8:30 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.

    Use It or Lose It: Mobilizing Knowledge to Improve Health


    Erin is a social worker who has spent her career working in the areas of health, education, and community development. In her current role as Knowledge Translation Specialist with the Saskatchewan Health Authority, Erin’s work focuses on mobilizing knowledge to support the health system to achieve health equity and provide culturally safe care for all.

    Originally from Treaty 4 Territory in Southwest Saskatchewan, she has called Treaty 6 Territory & Homeland of the Métis (Saskatoon, SK) home for over 20 years.

  • Angela Bowen
    Oct. 2, 2019 | 1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Engaging Community and Families to Promote Culturally Safe Care for Indigenous Mothers in Saskatchewan


    Angela Bowen is a Registered Nurse, trained midwife, with a PhD in Community Health and Epidemiology, with a focus on socially vulnerable, including Aboriginal, mothers. She has extensive clinical, educator, and administrator experience in Obstetrics and Mental Health and is a trained midwife. Her research focus, Maternal Mental Health, brings these areas together.

  • Audrey Boyer
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 8:45 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Standardizing Prenatal Education


    Audrey Boyer has been practicing as a Public Health Nutritionist in northern Saskatchewan for 14 years. She came to La Ronge to join the Population Health Unit after completing her undergraduate degree at the University of Manitoba and internship in Winnipeg, The Pas, and Flin Flon. Audrey has a passion for healthy prenatal and early childhood development, healthy public policies, changing environments to promote healthy choices and empowering people to make their own choices. She chairs the Healthy Eating Team of the Northern Healthy Communities Partnership, has taught the first year nutrition course to northern pre-professional students through the University of Regina, and is involved in various groups that strive to promote health in the north and across Saskatchewan. Audrey is president of the Skating Club and teaches community fitness classes in La Ronge. She is lucky to live near the lake and gets to enjoy kayaking, boating, walking in the bush and on winter trails with dogs, cross country skiing, and visiting at her friend Janet’s cabin, all with her husband and their three fun loving kids.

  • Dr. Mahli Brindamour
    (Keynote Panel)
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 1:45 p.m. – 2:45 p.m.

    Food Insecurity: Multiple Perspectives to Understand the Issue


    Mahli Brindamour provides care to mothers and infants cared for at Sanctum 1.5 prenatal and postnatal home for women at risk of HIV exposure in pregnancy, HIV positive, or at risk of child apprehension. Sanctum 1.5 is leading innovative practice by ensuring trauma informed care for women before their infants are born and then continuity of mother-infant care after delivery. Infants are discharged from the hospital in the care of their mothers with supervision from staff. Sanctum 1.5 also provides monitoring for neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) and is piloting the assessment and treatment of NAS in a community setting with pediatric oversight, which is a novel approach not yet developed elsewhere.

  • Carol Bullin
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 3:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Seeking to Improve Outcomes for Adolescents of Diverse Ethnicities Living with Undiagnosed Prediabetes and Type 2 Diabetes in Saskatchewan


    Carol Bullin, RN, PhD is a registered nurse for over 35 years and has practiced in a variety of clinical settings including critical care, operating room, and kidney disease/peritoneal dialysis. Dr. Bullin is an Assistant Professor in the College of Nursing at the University of Saskatchewan. Dr. Bullin’s program of research focuses on chronic kidney disease self-management and health promotion of Indigenous peoples in rural and remote populations.

  • John Carriere
    Oct. 4, 2019 | 8:30 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Building Research Relationships with Indigenous Communities


    John Carriere is from Cumberland House SK, where he grew up around hunting, fishing, and trapping. His parents are members of the Peter Ballantyne Cree Nation and the Nisichawayasihk Cree Nation. He has a Bachelor of Arts in Indigenous Studies from the University of Saskatchewan through NORPAC. John volunteered and worked in sports, recreation, and culture roles with different organizations while living in La Ronge, SK. He also has experience working within the Government of Saskatchewan with roles in the Ministry of Justice and the Ministry of Environment. Bringing a patient perspective to the team, John is also a Factor IX Hemophiliac and over the years has volunteered and been involved with Hemophilia Saskatchewan and the Canadian Hemophilia Society. By managing the disorder, he is able to enjoy playing basketball, weight training, and running

  • Barbara Compton
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 8:45 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    The Community Safety Education Strategy: Sustaining a Path to Cultural Transformation


    Barbara Compton, recently superannuated from a successful 36-year career in public education where she was a teacher, vice principal, principal, and Superintendent. She has been involved in education at the provincial and local levels serving on numerous committees to address the needs of Saskatchewan schools. Barbara presently works with Safe Saskatchewan as the Community Safety Education Strategy (CSES) Coordinator. Her role is to inform, involve, and engage provincial partners to actualize the CSES in Saskatchewan school divisions.

  • Liza Dahl
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 8:45 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    TTYL: Helping Youth Put the WE in Wellness


    Liza Dahl is an Addictions Educator for the Sun West School Division. She was born and raised in Davidson. Liza pursued education at the University of Lethbridge, obtaining a Bachelor in Health Science Counselling. Liza has worked with the Sun West School Division as the Addictions Educator since 2006. She has developed and offered a variety of prevention programs throughout the Division. These programs cover a variety of topics, mental health, addictions, risk-taking behaviour, health choices, brain development, and many more. Liza is living in Davidson with her husband, raising their three children. When she is not working with the school kids, Liza is very involved in coaching, mentoring, church, and cheering her own kids on.

  • Cheyanne Desnomie
    Oct. 4, 2019 | 8:30 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Building Research Relationships with Indigenous Communities


    Cheyanne Desnomie is a Plains Cree woman from Peepeekisis Cree Nation in the Treaty 4 territory of southern Saskatchewan. She holds a Bachelor of Arts Honours degree in Anthropology, and a Master of Arts in History from the University of Regina (U of R). Cheyanne’s research background focuses on oral history, social memory, identity, and the lasting influence of colonial policies on Indigenous people.

    Prior to joining the team at IPHRC, Cheyanne held a variety of roles at the U of R. Notably, she was the Manager of the Aboriginal Student Centre in addition to being the Student Success Facilitator for the nitôncipâmin omâ (OMA) Student Success Program, a retention and transition program for first-year Indigenous students at the U of R, First Nations University of Canada, Luther College and Campion College. Cheyanne is also a sessional instructor for the Department of Anthropology at the U of R. In her spare time, she enjoys crafting and creating everything from beadwork to knitting to building paper mache sculptures.

  • Bev Drew
    Oct. 4, 2019 | 8:30 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Supporting young children with FASD in Aboriginal Head Start Centres: Teachings from the Canadian FASD Mentoring Project


    Bev works in FASD prevention at the Saskatchewan Prevention Institute. She has a Bachelor of Applied Science in Child Development, a Master of Science in Human Development and Family Studies, and is a member of the Motivational Interviewing Network of Trainers (MINT). Her work at the Prevention Institute includes providing education, training, and resources related to FASD, prenatal development, alcohol, and Motivational Interviewing. She is also the lead for The Canadian FASD Mentoring Project funded by the Public Health Agency of Canada. This is a national project to offer FASD workshops to 134 Aboriginal Head Start programs in Urban and Northern Communities (AHSUNC) across Canada. Bev provides resources, expertise, and leadership to FASD Mentors and supports them to provide evidence-based FASD workshops tailored to each AHSUNC community.

  • Dr. Jeff Eichhorst
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 3:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Saskatchewan Prenatal Screening for Aneuploidy and Open Neural Tube Defects


    Dr. Jeff Eichhorst holds a Certificate in Laboratory Technology and Bachelor’s Degree in Biochemistry from the University of Regina and a PhD in Pathology and Laboratory Medicine from the University of Saskatchewan. He has over 35 years’ experience in clinical analytical laboratory testing.

    His main area of research and interest has been in both clinical and forensic toxicology as well as clinical analyses using tandem mass spectrometry. He helped develop and implement expanded newborn screening testing in Saskatchewan and has worked in developing other provincial screening programs such as maternal serum screening and colorectal cancer screening. He has many peer reviewed publications, invited presentations and abstract presentations at both national and international conferences in the USA and Europe. He has trained and mentored many undergraduate and graduate students as part of their laboratory training. He currently serves as a clinical biochemist for the Saskatchewan Health Authority at the Roy Romanow Provincial Laboratory in Regina, SK.

  • Dr. Marta Erlandson
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 3:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Physical literacy enriched communities: Baseline results of a home, school, and community approach to improving physical literacy


    Dr. Marta Erlandson is an Assistant Professor in the College of Kinesiology at the University of Saskatchewan. Her research program covers growth and development and musculoskeletal health across the life span. Dr. Erlandson is funded by the Saskatchewan Health Research Foundation and is a national expert on the influence of physical activity on musculoskeletal development and the effect of physical activity on children’s growth and maturation. She is seasoned in the implementation of physical activity interventions for both healthy and clinical populations.

  • Dr. Amanda Froehlich Chow
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 3:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Healthy Start/Départ Santé for Families (HSFF): A Collaborative, Multi-stakeholders Initiative to Support Families in Making Healthy Changes


    Dr. Amanda Froehlich Chow is a Métis postdoctoral researcher in the Canadian Centre for Health and Safety in Agriculture (CCHSA). She has a background in kinesiology, health promotion interventions, and public and population health studies. Her research focuses on primary health care and preventative interventions to promote the health of community, particularly among more vulnerable populations (Indigenous peoples, young children, and older adults). She has extensive experience collaborating with rural populations to develop, implement, and evaluate community-based health promotion interventions and she is a co-investigator on a number of grants funding research aimed at applying a community participatory approach to investigate the health needs of community. Dr. Froehlich Chow is passionate about collaborating with communities during each phase of the research process; as such she has expertise in employing mixed methods to evaluate program impact in a way that is meaningful for community partners.

  • Dr. Kali Gartner
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 8:45 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Caring for Women* Who Use Substances in Pregnancy and Their Infants: Recognizing the Structural and Socioeconomic Factors That Impact Women* and Families and Interventions to Improve Mother-Infant Outcomes

    *We recognize that not all people who are pregnant identify as women and the importance of using the preferred pronouns of our clients

    Kali Gartner is a family physician living in Saskatoon, SK, Treaty 6 Territory and the Homeland of the Metis Nation. She attended the U of S College of Medicine then moved to Vancouver, BC for Family Medicine Residency and Enhanced Skills Training in HIV/AIDS and Addiction Medicine. Dr. Gartner worked for two years with Sheway and FIR Square Unit at BC Women’s Hospital providing primary care, prenatal care, and follow-up with a pregnancy outreach program caring for women in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside impacted by trauma, violence, and substance use. She also worked with the Maxxine Wright Health Centre which is a similar program in Surrey, BC. She is now thankful to be back home working with the Saskatoon Community Clinic and Westside Community Clinic. Families accessing care at Westside Community Clinic are disproportionately impacted by effects of colonization, intergenerational trauma, and poverty. Integrated prenatal, medical, obstetrical, mental health, and addiction care is provided at the Westside Community Clinic in partnership with community organizations, Saskatchewan Health Authority, visiting medical specialists, and a holistic interdisciplinary team.

  • Brooke Graham
    Oct. 2, 2019 | 1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    The Role of Doulas in Healthcare


    Brooke Graham is the Prenatal Outreach Coordinator for the non-profit organization, KidsFirst North. She completed training as a labour doula with DONA International in 2010 and is a certified childbirth educator through Douglas College. Brooke is involved with several initiatives that promote prenatal education and support for women and families in northern Saskatchewan.

  • Dr. Holly Graham
    Oct. 2, 2019 | 1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Engaging Community and Families to Promote Culturally Safe Care for Indigenous Mothers in Saskatchewan


    Dr. Holly Graham is a member of the Thunderchild First Nation. She has worked as a Registered Nurse (RN) in a variety of northern communities, in addition to various other healthcare environments since 1985. Holly is an Assistant Professor in the College of Nursing, at the University of Saskatchewan. She maintains an active practice as a Registered Doctoral Psychologist, working primarily with individuals who have experienced trauma and symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Holly’s research is focused on Indigenous health, mental health, and well-being.

  • Moses Gordon
    Oct. 4, 2019 | 8:30 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Building Research Relationships with Indigenous Communities


    Moses Gordon is from the George Gordon First Nation. He holds a Master's of Public Policy, a Bachelor of Arts in History, and a Certificate in Economics from the University of Regina. Moses is currently a specialist on the Indigenous Research and Engagement Platform with SCPOR. Prior to working at IPHRC, Moses spent over three years working in research at the First Nations University of Canada. In addition to his professional roles, he also serves on the board of directors for George Gordon Developments Ltd., the economic development arm of the George Gordon First Nation, as well as the Indigenous Advisory Circle at the University of Regina.

    As the Indigenous Research and Engagement Platform Specialist housed out of IPHRC's Regina location, Moses is responsible for supporting relationships between health researchers and Indigenous communities in the southern half of the province. Promoting the wellbeing of First Nation communities has consistently remained the underlying passion that drives his career. While his foray into health research is a recent one, he arrived from a multidisciplinary background in research on Indigenous nation rebuilding in respect to business development and governance reform. An avid bookworm, Moses strongly believes that the pen is mightier than the sword.

  • Jhalene Groth
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 8:45 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    TTYL: Helping Youth Put the WE in Wellness


    Jhalene Groth is the Addictions Counsellor with Saskatchewan Health Authority that is based out of Unity and covers the surrounding communities of Kerrobert and Macklin. Jhalene has been working in this position for the past 13 years and previously worked in the Swift Current office for four years in the same position. Jhalene works with both youth and adults and enjoys the prevention focus when working with youth. Jhalene has been involved in various community groups in her career that have worked to provide numerous services within each community. In her spare time, she is busy with her two young children and their activities.

  • Dr. Jasmine Hasselback
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 8:45 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Improving the Child Health Clinic Experience


    Dr. Jasmine Hasselback is a Public Health Physician and Medical Health Officer for the Saskatchewan Health Authority in Saskatoon. Her work is focused on preventing chronic disease and injury, and in promoting health and well-being. Part of that work includes intervening early in life and working to prevent adverse childhood experiences and helping to build child resiliency. Her work often includes partnerships with many non-healthcare related programs, services, and organizations because she knows that although her job is to keep people from getting sick, the healthcare system holds very few of the levers to make that happen.

  • Veronica Hawley
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 8:45 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Baby's Best Start Prenatal Program


    Veronica Hawley is a Public Health Nurse working for the Saskatchewan Health Authority in Moose Jaw and is one of the facilitators of the Babies Best Start Prenatal Program. Veronica is a graduate of the University of Saskatchewan Nursing Education Program and has worked in the area of Public Health Nursing for the past 15 years. She has had the opportunity to work for Public Health in Northern British Columbia and in both rural and urban settings in the province of Saskatchewan. Her role as a public health nurse has varied over the years, but she has always had a passion for family health and enjoys working with young mothers and at-risk families. Veronica loves spending all of her extra time with her husband, family, friends, and with her two school-aged children, Logan and Olivia.

  • Connie Herman
    Oct. 4, 2019 | 8:30 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Knowledge Exchange in Action Through Facilitation


    As the Provincial Coordinator for the Nobody's Perfect Parent Program, Connie is passionate about supporting parents, families, and communities. Based out of the Saskatchewan Prevention Institute, Connie provides training, resource development, and support to service providers who work with parents and families. She has a BA with majors in psychology and sociology, and Bachelors of Social Work. As a Parent Program Coordinator, Parent Coach, and a mom to a 4-year-old girl and 10-year-old boy, Connie recognizes that parenting is one of the most rewarding, most important, and also the most challenging job there is.

  • Erin Hewitt
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 8:45 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Baby's Best Start Prenatal Program


    Erin Hewitt is a Public Health Nurse working for the Saskatchewan Health Authority in Moose Jaw and is one of the facilitators of the Babies Best Start Prenatal Program. Erin is a graduate of the University of Saskatchewan Nursing Education Program and has been nursing for over 15 years. Her nursing career began in acute care, working in the field of pediatrics and infection control. She was given the opportunity to work in Public Health Nursing and has found this to be her passion. She is a caring and empathetic nurse who feels that holistic and family-centered care is the best way to provide optimal care for her clients. Erin is a busy wife and mom of two children. In her spare time, she likes to read and walk her two energetic dogs.

  • Lee Hinton
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 3:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Increasing our Capacity to Support the Healthy Development of Young Children in Saskatchewan Zero to Three Fellowship


    Lee Hinton has been the Program Manager at the Saskatchewan Prevention Institute since 2007. Lee’s career has focused on children’s, women’s, and family health and well-being. Lee obtained her undergraduate degree from the University of Waterloo, holds a Post Graduate Degree in Art Therapy from the University of Western Ontario, and a Masters of Social Work from Wilfred Laurier University. She is a current Fellow with the Zero to Three Fellowship Class 2018-2020. Lee has expertise in the development and implementation of primary prevention approaches that increase the probability that Saskatchewan children are given opportunities to develop a strong foundation for later health and development. To this end, Lee works extensively with communities throughout Saskatchewan and participates on national and provincial projects and advisory committees to develop a common knowledge-base and increase agreement regarding the importance of the early years. She provides support and leadership, ensuring that programs and projects meet their goals in an efficient, research-based, high quality, and effective manner. Lee developed and coordinates the Early Childhood Mental Health Program, which focuses on bringing emerging, evidence-based information and training to professionals throughout the province.

  • Natalie Houser
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 3:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Physical literacy enriched communities: Baseline results of a home, school, and community approach to improving physical literacy


    Natalie Houser is a PhD Candidate in the College of Kinesiology at the University of Saskatchewan. Natalie is a community-based researcher with her research currently focused on the development of physical literacy in school-aged children through multi-environmental approaches. Her PhD research is also exploring how aspects of children’s’ growth and maturation influences their physical literacy.

  • Dr. Louise Humbert
    (Concurrent Sessions)

    Oct. 3, 2019 | 3:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Healthy Start/Départ Santé for Families (HSFF): A Collaborative, Multi-stakeholders Initiative to Support Families in Making Healthy Changes


    Oct. 3, 2019 | 3:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Physical literacy enriched communities: Baseline results of a home, school, and community approach to improving physical literacy


    Dr. Louise Humbert is a professor in the College of Kinesiology at the University of Saskatchewan. She is a community-based researcher with over 20 years’ experience working in community settings. A founding member of Saskatoon and Saskatchewan in motion, Louise has experience listening to the needs of community members and working with them to develop initiatives that reflect their needs and realities. She is currently involved in two large projects assessing the impact of interventions on the development of physical literacy in school-aged children. Louise is also very interested in the thoughts and experiences of parents and educators and she works to ensure their voices are heard in all aspects of program development, implementation, and evaluation. Louise is currently the Chair of the Board of Directors of Active Saskatchewan.

  • Dr. Mark Inman
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 3:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Primary and Secondary Prevention Strategies in Pediatric Type 2 Diabetes


    Dr. Mark Inman is a Pediatric Endocrinologist affiliated with the University of Saskatchewan College of Medicine and works with the LiveWell Pediatric Diabetes Program at Royal University Hospital in Saskatoon. His clinical work involves both type 1 and type 2 diabetes as well as an array of pediatric endocrine disorders.

  • Dr. James Irvine
    Oct. 2, 2019 | 1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Changing the Story About Alcohol


    Dr. James Irvine, is a public health and preventive medicine physician, a Professor Emeritus with the University of Saskatchewan’s College of Medicine, and has been the Medical Health Officer for the northern half of the province since 1985. He lives in LaRonge where he has been involved with public health, health care, administration, teaching, and research. His main public health and research interests involve environmental health, communicable disease control, health promotion, children’s health and Indigenous health. James has been a member of the Medical Advisory Committee of the Prevention Institute since 2001 and the chair since 2014. James has been supporting the Northern Alcohol Strategy since its inception.

  • Joan Johnson
    Oct. 2, 2019 | 1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Changing the Story About Alcohol


    Joan Johnson is a traditional Indigenous woman who lives with her husband, Harold, on the north end of Montreal Lake. Joan has had a lengthy career in justice and community development that has included work with Correctional Services of Canada, development of Restorative Justice approaches in Aboriginal communities, work with the Ontario Federation of Indigenous Friendship Centres, and the role of a complex case needs Probation Officer in northern Saskatchewan. She was recognized for her experience and expertise, seconded to work on the alcohol strategy in January of 2016, and is now employed with Community Safety and Well-being branch for the province.

  • Dawn Kellington
    Oct. 2, 2019 | 1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Hear our Voices: A Conversation about Youth, Mental Health, & Creative Expression


    Dawn Kellington is the coordinator of the Survivor 101 program offered through CFS Saskatoon. The Survivor 101 program offers in-school support groups for youth experiencing mental health challenges and or violence as well as community engagement projects featuring youth voice. Dawn has edited two publications featuring the stories of youth; Day by Day: A Handbook for Teens and Hand in Hand: A Guidebook for Adults. In these publications, through written and visual art, youth share their experiences of mental health and/or violence and use their stories to encourage, influence, and impact other youth, health professionals, and community leaders. The Survivor 101 program aims to create safe spaces in which youth can learn, connect, and be empowered. Two youth advocates who contributed to the publications will be co-presenting.

  • Dr. Alexandra King
    Oct. 2, 2019 | 1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Indigenous Wellness as Prevention


    Dr. Alexandra King, MD, FRCPC, is a citizen of the Nipissing First Nation (Ontario).

    Alexandra is the inaugural Cameco Chair in Indigenous Health at the University of Saskatchewan. She works with Indigenous communities and relevant stakeholders to understand the health and wellness needs of First Nations and Métis peoples in Saskatchewan and the structural changes needed for improved Indigenous health outcomes. Alexandra brings leadership skills in culturally safe and responsive research and care, Two-eyed Seeing (bringing together Indigenous and Western worldviews or forms of knowledges) and Ethical Space—which needs to be created when peoples with disparate worldviews are poised to engage each other.

    As a First Nation researcher, Alexandra is a Principal Investigator on various CIHR research grants related to Indigenous people and HIV, HCV, and co-infections. Other research interests include Indigenous wellness and Indigenous research ethics, and much of her research is community-based interventions grounded in Indigenous epistemology, culture, and wellness. Alexandra also teaches Indigenous health and contributes to the University of Saskatchewan’s decolonization, reconciliation, and Indigenization.

  • Ken Lamoureux
    (Keynote Session)
    Oct. 2, 2019 | 10:30 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

    Changing the Conversation: Reframing FASD in Manitoba


    Ken Lamoureux has worked for the Manitoba Government for over 9 years, and has been a Program and Policy Consultant for the past 7 years with Healthy Child Manitoba Office (HCMO). His work at HCMO focuses on FASD intervention and support initiatives for people with FASD (across the lifespan) and their families. Prior to working at HCMO, Ken worked as a special education teacher for Manitoba Justice. He holds a Bachelor of Physical Education (BPE) and a Bachelor or Education (B.Ed) from the University of Manitoba.

  • Sara Langley
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 3:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Canada’s Food Guide-What’s All the Hype About?


    Sara Langley is the Regional Nutritionist with Indigenous Services Canada in Saskatchewan. She works to support First Nations communities and the people that work in the communities in the areas of prenatal, infant, and childhood nutrition, with a focus on food security. Sara lives in Pense with her husband and dog, and spends countless hours in the summers in her garden.

  • Dr. Noni MacDonald
    (Keynote Session)
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 11:00 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.

    Optimizing Vaccine Uptake – Addressing Vaccine Hesitancy


    Noni MacDonald is a Professor of Paediatrics (Infectious Diseases) at Dalhousie University and the IWK Health Centre in Halifax, Nova Scotia. She is a former Dean of Medicine at Dalhousie University and was the first woman in Canada to be a Dean of Medicine. Her two current major areas of interest involve global health. The first is vaccines including vaccine safety, hesitancy, demand, pain mitigation, education and policy, especially through her work with the World Health Organization (WHO). She has been a member of SAGE (the Strategic Advisory Group of Experts on immunization for WHO) since 2017. This committee provides advice to the WHO on all aspects of vaccinology. She also chairs the WHO Decade of Vaccine assessment committee that has been charged with reviewing the progress (or lack thereof) on the Global Vaccine Action Plan (GVAP) goals as a precursor for development of the next Decade of Vaccines plan. The second area is MicroResearch - building capacity in community focused research in developing countries and now also in Canada (www.microresearch-international.ca) to help interdisciplinary health professionals find local solutions for community health problems that fit the context, culture, and resources. She is a Founder and Co-Director of the Centre for MicroResearch International.

    Dr. MacDonald has published over 400 papers; was the founding Editor-in-Chief of Paediatrics & Child Health for over 20 years, and a former Editor-in-Chief of CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). She is the Editor for Child Health for new Oxford University Press publication Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Global Public Health. Dr. MacDonald has long been recognized in Canada and internationally, as an advocate for child and youth health and as a leader in paediatric infectious diseases and global health.

  • Della Magnusson
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 8:45 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Caring for Women* Who Use Substances in Pregnancy and Their Infants: Recognizing the Structural and Socioeconomic Factors That Impact Women* and Families and Interventions to Improve Mother-Infant Outcomes


    Della Magnusson provide primary care and prenatal care to women and their infants at the Westside Community Clinic. Some women who access care at Westside Community Clinic are impacted by effects of colonization, intergenerational trauma, and poverty. Integrated prenatal, medical, obstrical, mental health, and addiction care is provided at the Westside Community Clinic in partnership with community organizations, Saskatchewan Health Authority, visiting medical specialists, and a holistic interdisciplinary team.

    Della Magnusson provide care to mothers and infants cared for at Sanctum 1.5 prenatal and postnatal home or women at risk of HIV exposure in pregnancy, HIV positive or at risk of child apprehension. Sanctum 1.5 is leading innovative practice by ensuring trauma informed care for women before their infants is born and then continuity of mother-infant care after delivery. Infants are discharged from the hospital in the care of their mothers with supervision from staff. Sanctum 1.5 also provides monitoring for neonatal abstinence syndrome and is piloting assessment and treatment of NAS in a community setting with pediatric oversight which is a novel approach not yet developed elsewhere.

  • Natalya Mason
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 3:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Tell It Like It Is: Engaging and Innovative Comprehensive Sexuality Education for People with Developmental Disabilities, and Those Who Support Them


    Natalya Mason is a sexual health educator and a social worker who was born and raised in Saskatoon. She holds a B.A. in Psychology from the University of Saskatchewan, a BSW from the University of Regina, and a Post-Graduate Certificate in Sexual Health from the University of Alberta. She is currently completing a M.A. in Women’s, Gender, and Sexualities Studies at the U of S, where her graduate work focuses on social and emotional barriers to condom use for adolescent girls. Natalya has been the Education/Outreach Coordinator at Saskatoon Sexual Health for five years. In that time, she has taught in communities across the province, been involved in numerous projects nationally, and amassed a collection of twelve wooden penises. She is a big believer in community, and as such is proud to be a lifelong member of the Girl Guides of Canada, and to sit on the Board of Directors with OUTSaskatoon.

  • Erick McNair
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 3:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Seeking to Improve Outcomes for Adolescents of Diverse Ethnicities Living with Undiagnosed Prediabetes and Type 2 Diabetes in Saskatchewan


    Erick McNair, PhD is a faculty member of the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine and an Associate Member of the Department of Surgery, Division of Cardiac Surgery. Dr. McNair’s background is in cardiac pathology and clinical perfusion during cardiac surgery. He is involved in teaching, research, and scholarly activities. Dr. McNair’s research focus is on the identification of biochemical markers of organ injury (heart, kidney, and brain), prevention of diabetes in youth, and platelet function testing.

  • Cassie McVay
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 3:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Canada’s Food Guide-What’s All the Hype About?


    Cassie McVay a Community Dietitian with the Meadow Lake Tribal Council. Cassie is from New Brunswick and has lived in Saskatchewan for five years. Cassie supports 9 First Nation communities in all things nutrition! She spends most of spare her time at home on her acreage with her fiancé, three dogs, two alpacas, two donkeys, two goats (soon to be three!), and her flock of unique chickens! When she isn’t tending to her animals she is sewing, painting, gardening, and spending time on the land.

  • Dr. Maryam Mehtar
    Oct. 2, 2019 | 1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Paediatric School-Based – Health: A community based alternate moldel of care


    Dr. Mehtar is currently an assistant professor in the Department of Paediatrics, at the University of Saskatchewan. She is the section head for the Division of Social Paediatrics/ Paediatric School-based Health in Saskatoon. She is also the Program Director for the Paediatric Residency Program at the University of Saskatchewan. She completed her medical school degree in 1989 at the University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg, South Africa. She completed her Paediatric Residency at the University of Saskatchewan in 1999.

  • Dr. Melissa Mirosh
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 3:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Contraception for Adolescents


    Dr. Melissa Mirosh graduated medical school from Queen’s University in 2000, followed by her Obstetrics and Gynecology Residency at the U of S that finished in 2005. She returned to Queen’s to complete the CARE (Contraception Advice, Research, and Education) Fellowship in 2006. After working in private practice in Southern Alberta, Dr. Mirosh joined the Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Sciences in 2010. Her work interests include contraception, teen pregnancy, and medical education. She is a proud mom of three, including four-year-old twins who keep her very busy and entertained.

  • Gord Moker
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 8:45 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    The Community Safety Education Strategy: Sustaining a Path to Cultural Transformation


    Gord Moker, Chief Executive Officer of Safe Saskatchewan, was born and raised in Wakaw, Saskatchewan, and demonstrates daily passion and commitment to moving the vision of an injury-free Saskatchewan forward. Gord is extremely familiar with the injury prevention world, having worked for the Saskatchewan Workers’ Compensation Board (WCB) for 15 years. Today, Gord continues to aid in the steady forward movement of Mission: Zero, towards transforming our provincial culture and positioning injury prevention as a core value.

  • Jessica Moyer
    (Keynote Session)
    Oct. 2, 2019 | 10:30 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

    Framing to Enhance Public Understanding: Strategies for Communicating About Healthy Childhood Development


    Jessica Moyer is a sociologist and geographer, and an associate in the Research Interpretation and Application unit at the FrameWorks Institute. In her role, she helps advocates on a range of progressive social issues engage the public in more productive conversations – ones that build public understanding and drive positive change.

    Prior to joining FrameWorks, Jessica worked with several social and environmental organizations, including The Mighty Creatives, where she helped disadvantaged young adults transition from school into meaningful employment; The Race Equality Centre, where she provided research and advocacy support to black, minority ethnic, and immigrant communities; and the Center for Marine Resource Studies in the Turks and Caicos Islands, where she coordinated conservation, education, and community-building initiatives. Jessica has also taught at universities in the United States and the United Kingdom.

  • Dr. Marcella Ogenchuk
    Oct. 2, 2019 | 1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Exploring Pediatric Oral Health in and With One Indigenous Community


    Dr. Marcella Ogenchuk is a registered nurse and faculty member in the University of Saskatchewan’s College of Nursing. Dr. Ogenchuk has extensive pediatric nursing experience in acute and community settings and as a nurse leader in oral health in children. Dr. Ogenchuk brings her expertise in developing pathways of care for elementary students requiring urgent oral health care in an urban center using a multidisciplinary approach and facilitating school oral health preventative strategies.

  • Anita Ogurlu
    Oct. 4, 2019 | 8:30 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Caught Between Two Worlds: Newcomer Youth Overcome Challenges to Embrace Life!


    Anita Ogurlu, Cultural Bridging Facilitator at the Open Door Society has lived abroad for over 25 years. She has worked in multinational corporations as an advertising executive. In 2005, she returned to academia completing a Master’s in Cultural Studies (Turkey, 2007) and PhD in Humanities and Cultural Studies (Birkbeck College, UK 2016). Anita has lectured in media and cultural studies, visual communication, and aesthetics. She has presented at conferences across the globe. Anita is a lecturer at the University of Saskatchewan and St. Thomas More College.

  • Dr. Johnmark Opondo
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 3:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Let’s Talk Syphilis – Mom and Baby


    Dr. Johnmark Opondo is a Medical Health Officer for Saskatchewan Health Authority - Saskatoon, and has several years of experience in public health – from reducing high rates of maternal mortality in three African countries, to a background in reproductive health – as a public health expert. He received his Masters training in Public Health from Atlanta’s Emory University, worked at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Atlanta, following a clinical career in Kenya as a medical doctor, where he also served as a District Medical Health Officer in the city of Mombasa. His portfolio with Population and Public Health includes Communicable Disease Control, Sexual/Street Health, International Travel & Vaccine Management, STI and Positive Living Program/SHR HIV Strategy and Emergency Preparedness.

  • Janice Osecap
    Oct. 2, 2019 | 1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Engaging Community and Families to Promote Culturally Safe Care for Indigenous Mothers in Saskatchewan


    Janice Osecap is a Cree mother from Moosomin First Nation in Saskatchewan. She is currently a student in the Indian Teacher Program (ITEP) in the College of Education and is an active and invaluable member of the Indigenous Birth Network research team. Janice is proud of her cultural upbringing and passionate about helping Indigenous youth access their culture. She is a recipient of the Indigenous Achievement Award as well as a CIHR award to travel to Montreal in June 2019 to present at the Indigenous Gender Wellness Idea Fair and Learning Circle. Janice aims to help create positive Indigenous identities and build individual confidence for Indigenous youth.

  • Dr. Cassie Pancyr
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 8:45 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Caring for Women* Who Use Substances in Pregnancy and Their Infants: Recognizing the Structural and Socioeconomic Factors That Impact Women* and Families and Interventions to Improve Mother-Infant Outcomes

    *We recognize that not all people who are pregnant identify as women and the importance of using the preferred pronouns of our clients

    Dr. Cassie Pancyr provide primary care and prenatal care to women and their infants at the Westside Community Clinic. Some women who access care at Westside Community Clinic are impacted by effects of colonization, intergenerational trauma, and poverty. Integrated prenatal, medical, obstrical, mental health, and addiction care is provided at the Westside Community Clinic in partnership with community organizations, Saskatchewan Health Authority, visiting medical specialists, and a holistic interdisciplinary team.

  • Carrie Pratt
    Oct. 2, 2019 | 1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Engaging Community and Families to Promote Culturally Safe Care for Indigenous Mothers in Saskatchewan


    Carrie Pratt is from Birch Hills, Saskatchewan and is of Cree, Metis, and Settler ancestry. She works as a Registered Nurse in rural homecare while she completes full time studies in the Master of Nursing, Thesis Program at the University of Saskatchewan. She uses participatory action research and patient-oriented research methodologies to understand the lived experiences of Indigenous mothers who have had a baby in a Saskatchewan hospital.

  • Kavitha Ramachandran
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 3:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Healthy Start/Départ Santé for Families (HSFF): A Collaborative, Multi-stakeholders Initiative to Support Families in Making Healthy Changes


    Kavitha Ramachandran is a PhD Candidate in the Department of Community Health and Epidemiology at the University of Saskatchewan, specializing in Community and Population Health Sciences. She joined the Healthy Start research team in September 2013 and works as a Family Engagement Program Coordinator. Kavitha worked as a Nutrition Research Coordinator for the College of Pharmacy and Nutrition prior to her enrolment in the PhD program. Her areas of interest in research include collaborative and community-based participatory research: to promote health and wellness for children and families, Indigenous and under-served communities, newcomers, refugees and diverse populations. She developed family engagement initiative after community consultations which is currently being pilot tested in urban and rural Saskatchewan. It is a home-based/visiting health promotion intervention to encourage healthy eating, physical activity, and positive conversation among young children and families. Kavitha is an internationally trained dietitian and has master’s degrees in Nutrition and Dietetics.

  • Dr. Madhav Sarda
    (Keynote Session)
    Oct. 4, 2019 | 10:30 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

    Childhood Anxiety: Worried About Worrying


    Madhav Sarda is a Child and Adolescent Psychiatrist in Saskatoon. He trained at the University of Saskatchewan and completed medical school at the University of Alberta. His practice involves treating kids of all ages with a wide variety of mental disorders. This includes on the psychiatric inpatient ward, the Pediatric inpatient ward, and in his outpatient clinic. He also works with the University to teach and train residents and medical students. Madhav grew up in Alberta and moved to Saskatoon almost 10 years ago, where he lives now with his wife and two children.

  • Janice Seebach
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 3:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Let’s Talk Syphilis – Mom and Baby


    Janice Seebach has been a Public Health Nurse for Saskatchewan Health Authority - Saskatoon for almost 25 years. She graduated from University of Saskatchewan with Bachelor of Science in Nursing, and has primarily worked at the STI Clinic in Saskatoon. In 2012, Janice took on the Nurse Clinician role to support Sexual and Street Health staff; providing orientation, policy development, and programming as it relates to STBBI and harm reduction services.

  • Dave Shanks
    Oct. 2, 2019 | 1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Youth Who Thrive


    Dave Shanks has been working alongside young people for the past 20 years. By translating academic research into practice (Knowledge into Action), he hopes to help transform the way we intentionally support young people to make a positive transition to adulthood.

  • Tanis Shanks
    Oct. 4, 2019 | 8:30 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Knowledge Exchange in Action Through Facilitation


    Tanis Shanks is the CAPC Training and Education Coordinator for the Saskatchewan Prevention Institute. For over a decade, Tanis has worked with parents and children in numerous capacities, including program development, facilitation, mentorship, childcare, and administration. As a parent herself, Tanis is very passionate about parenting education, healthy child development, violence prevention, and human rights. Tanis also delivers trainings, presentations, and workshops around Saskatchewan on the Nobody’s Perfect Parenting Program, Positive Discipline in Everyday Parenting, Kids Have Stress Too!, and My Curious Brain. Tanis is a member of the Dad Central Canada Conference organizing committee and is the Dad Central Canada Representative for Saskatchewan. Tanis’ educational background includes a Bachelor of Arts (Hon.) majoring in Indigenous Studies from the University of Saskatchewan, Bachelor of Social Work and Master of Social Work, both from the University of Regina.

  • Dr. Seyara Shwetz
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 3:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Saskatchewan’s TREKK Roadshow: A novel approach to dissemination critical PEM resources to rural healthcare practitioners


    Dr. Sey Shwetz is in her fourth year of residency training, pursuing dual certification in Emergency Medicine at the University of Saskatchewan and Pediatric Emergency Medicine at the University of Alberta. Her interests include pre-hospital medicine and maximizing outcomes for pediatric patients in rural and remote areas. She is a keen wellness champion and an active leader in the resident physician community, currently acting as the Board Chair for Resident Doctors of Canada.

  • Dr. Keith Da Silva
    Oct. 2, 2019 | 1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Oral Health, General Health, and Overall Well-being – Why Prevention Matters


    Dr. Keith Da Silva is an assistant professor at the College of Dentistry, University of Saskatchewan; a Fellow of the Royal College of Dentists of Canada; and a dual specialist in pediatric dentistry and dental public health. He currently serves on the Board of Directors at the Canadian Association in Public Health Dentistry. As a clinician, he has worked in private practice, community clinics, and hospital settings. As a researcher, his main focus is improving access to oral health care through community-based interventions and upstream policy solutions.

  • Dr. Stuart Skinner
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 9:45 a.m. – 10:45 a.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    A Combined Response to Address Health Gaps in Indigenous Communities


    Dr. Stuart Skinner received his medical degree from the University of Saskatchewan in 2002. He also holds a Diploma in Tropical Medicine and Hygiene from the Gorgas Institute at the University of Alabama (2002), and a Diploma in Tropical Medicine and Hygiene from the University of Peru (2005). Dr. Skinner is a Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians of Canada (2006), and holds a Certificate of Special Competence in Infectious Diseases (2007). He is an Assistant Professor at the University of Saskatchewan. Currently Dr. Skinner works as an Infectious Disease Specialist at the Regina Infectious Diseases Clinic, as well as traveling to several locations in Saskatchewan to provide Infections Disease clinics. In addition Dr. Skinner has been instrumental in designing the Wellness Wheel, which is a community led, multi-disciplinary and integrated approach to health care disparities affecting First Nation communities.

  • Maria Soonias Ali
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 8:45 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Promoting Youth Engagement: Techniques, Goals, and Challenges


    Maria Soonias Ali and Donna Banach are both YAP Coordinators at the Saskatchewan Prevention Institute. As part of the Institute’s FASD team, they support the work of the overall FASD Prevention Program. In addition, both Maria and Donna travel to communities throughout Saskatchewan to provide presentations to youth and adult allies in order to increase honest and safe conversations about alcohol-related harms. The YAP Program, in collaboration with the Institute’s Sexual and Reproductive Health Program, administers Youth Health Community Grants to support youth to raise awareness about sexual health, alcohol-related harms, and harm reduction in their community. The program also develops resources for both services providers and youth; most recently these have included the two facilitator manuals discussed during this training. In 2018, Donna was hired as the Northern Youth Action for Prevention Coordinator at the Saskatchewan Prevention Institute. Based in La Ronge, this position is uniquely positioned in the office of Integrated Justice Services Community Safety and Well-Being and allows for expansion of the YAP Program in Northern Saskatchewan.

  • Shelley Spurr
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 3:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Seeking to Improve Outcomes for Adolescents of Diverse Ethnicities Living with Undiagnosed Prediabetes and Type 2 Diabetes in Saskatchewan


    Shelley Spurr, PhD is a Registered Nurse (RN) and has over 20 years of pediatric nursing experience in a variety of areas including acute care, public health, and home care. Dr. Spurr is now working as an Associate Professor in the College of Nursing at the University of Saskatchewan. Dr. Spurr’s research focuses on developing prevention strategies and innovative approaches to screen for risk and complications of diabetes. Currently, Dr. Spurr is conducting an investigation that will generate insight into adolescents’ and parents’ experiences of prediabetes and type 2 diabetes and identify possibilities for community-based health promotion interventions.

  • Crystal Storey
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 8:45 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    TTYL: Helping Youth Put the WE in Wellness


    Crystal Storey is a Population Health Promotion Coordinator with the Saskatchewan Health Authority based out of Rosetown and works throughout west central Saskatchewan. She is involved in diverse initiatives whose purposes are to help people thrive at whatever stage of life they are in. Youth-focused ones are of particular interest to her, both in her professional and volunteer work. Crystal can often be found in her “free time” at the local youth centre or spending time with her nieces and nephews.

  • Dr. Hortense Nsoh Tabien
    (Concurrent Sessions)

    Oct. 3, 2019 | 8:45 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Improving the Child Health Clinic Experience


    Oct. 3, 2019 | 8:45 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Vaccinations and Immunization: What You Need to Know


    Dr. Hortense Nsoh Tabien obtained her Medical degree at the University of Milan, Italy and holds a PhD degree in Anatomy and Cell Biology from the University of Saskatchewan. She completed her residency/fellowship training in Public Health and Preventive Medicine (PHPM) at the University of Saskatchewan. Dr. Tabien is currently working as Medical Health Officer for the SHA, Saskatoon area covering the portfolio for Immunization and Travel Health. Her professional interest involves vulnerable groups including immigrant and refugee health, women health, and physician health. She is a mother of adorable twin boys, whom she describes as “her sunshine” and who give her the drive to do all. Dr. Tabien enjoys reading science fiction novels and learning new hobbies. She like sports and enjoys jogging, football (soccer), and dancing.

  • Dr. Valerie Tarasuk
    (Keynote Session)
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 1:15 p.m. – 1:45 p.m.

    Food Insecurity in Canada: The Case for Evidence-Based Policy


    (Keynote Panel)
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 1:45 p.m. – 2:45 p.m.

    Food Insecurity: Multiple Perspectives to Understand the Issue


    Valerie Tarasuk is a Professor in the Department of Nutritional Sciences at the University of Toronto, where she has been on faculty since 1994. The primary focus of her research is household food insecurity. She has led several tri-council research grants to elucidate the scope, nature, and health implications of this problem in Canada, assess the effectiveness of community responses, and determine how public policies and programs impact food insecurity prevalence and severity. In 2011, she led the establishment of PROOF, an interdisciplinary research program designed to identify effective policy approaches to reduce household food insecurity in Canada. In 2018, she received an honorary doctorate from Queen’s University in recognition of her work.

  • Dallas Tetarenko
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 3:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Tell It Like It Is: Engaging and Innovative Comprehensive Sexuality Education for People with Developmental Disabilities, and Those Who Support Them


    Dallas Tetarenko is a Community Inclusion Consultant for the Saskatchewan Association for Community Living. He has worked within the disability support sector for 10 years. Dallas pursues a variety of artistic endeavours, including ceramics, painting, sculpting, furniture design and fabrication, and drawing. He hosts his own radio program that features music from film, theatre, and television, which is currently finishing its sixth year of production.

  • Dr. Cassandra Opikokew Wajuntah
    (Keynote Panel)
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 1:45 p.m. – 2:45 p.m.

    Food Insecurity: Multiple Perspectives to Understand the Issue


    Cassandra is a member of Canoe Lake Cree First Nation and was raised in Meadow Lake in Northern Saskatchewan. She graduated at the top of her class in 2009 from the University of Regina with a Bachelor of Arts in Journalism (BAJ, Certificate in Indigenous Communication Arts (INCA) and a Master's of Public Administration (MPA). As a PhD candidate in public policy, she was the recipient of a CIHR Doctoral Research Award ($108,000) for her dissertation entitled The Indian Solution to the Policy Problem: Developing an Indigenous Policymaking Model to Address First Nations Health Disparities. She is working with Indigenous health organizations in Saskatchewan and Hawai’i to examine how self-determined Indigenous health policymaking models are more effective at improving the health of Indigenous people than Western colonial models. Professionally, she is currently Director of the Indigenous Peoples’ Health Research Centre (IPHRC) and was recently a Visiting Scholar at the U of Hawai’i's John A. Burns School of Medicine in the Department of Native Hawaiian Health. She currently resides in Fort Qu’Appelle, SK with her husband Justin, a member of Standing Buffalo Dakota First Nation, their 6 dogs and their 3 wild toddlers.

  • Kristyn White
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 3:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Tell It Like It Is: Engaging and Innovative Comprehensive Sexuality Education for People with Developmental Disabilities, and Those Who Support Them


    Kristyn White is a Personal Support Worker and Team Leader at Creative Options Regina (COR). Kristyn has been with COR for four years, and has been involved within the disability sector for eight years. She completed her Bachelor of Sport and Reaction Studies majoring in Therapeutic Recreation in 2016 from the University of Regina, and completed her field work practicum at Inclusion Regina. Kristyn is planning to start working on her MSc this fall, and would like to focus her graduate research on sexual health and education for those experiencing disability. Kristyn is passionate about empowering individuals experiencing disability, and encouraging people to make their own decisions regarding their bodies, their lives, and their own experiences. Kristyn is dedicated to educating others on Gentle Teaching, person-centered thinking, and creating meaningful relationships within disability support work.

  • Cara Zukewich
    Oct. 3, 2019 | 8:45 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.
    Presentation/Workshop Title:

    Child Injury Prevention Programming and Action Guide


    Cara Zukewich works at the Saskatchewan Prevention Institute as the Child Injury Prevention Program Coordinator. Cara’s role is to promote the importance of injury prevention for children. Developing injury prevention resources for professionals and caregivers using evidence-based information is a major aspect of the Injury Prevention Program. Cara works with communities to meet their needs (proactively and on request) and represents the Prevention Institute on interagency committees. The purpose of the Child Injury Prevention Coordinator is to organize training efforts, on a variety of injury topics, including child passenger safety, bicycle safety, playground safety, home safety, with the possibility of additional focus areas. Cara has been with the Prevention Institute since 2002 working on resource development, knowledge translation, facilitation, and planning professional development opportunities.

Abstracts