• 7-510: A Review of Nutritional Recommendations for Pregnant Women Living with HIV

    A Review of Nutritional Recommendations for Pregnant Women Living with HIV

    Report, 2012


    Ensuring proper nutrition is a critical component of living with HIV as it is with being pregnant. The two conditions combined mean that pregnant women living with HIV are especially vulnerable to nutrient deficiencies and these women must monitor their nutritional status accordingly. The review provides general recommendations to address these issues.

    Report, 2012


    Ensuring proper nutrition is a critical component of living with HIV as it is with being pregnant. The two conditions combined mean that pregnant women living with HIV are especially vulnerable to nutrient deficiencies and these women must monitor their nutritional status accordingly. The review provides general recommendations to address these issues.



    SKU: 7-510
  • Adolescent Pregnancy in Saskatchewan

    Adolescent Pregnancy in Saskatchewan

    Report, 2014


    In Canada, rates of adolescent pregnancy remain among the highest in developed countries and rates in Saskatchewan are among the highest in Canada. In an effort to address the needs of Saskatchewan youth, the Saskatchewan Prevention Institute has developed this report to provide a picture of adolescent pregnancy in Saskatchewan and to identify best practices that my address the specific circumstances of Saskatchewan Youth.

    Report, 2014


    In Canada, rates of adolescent pregnancy remain among the highest in developed countries and rates in Saskatchewan are among the highest in Canada. In an effort to address the needs of Saskatchewan youth, the Saskatchewan Prevention Institute has developed this report to provide a picture of adolescent pregnancy in Saskatchewan and to identify best practices that my address the specific circumstances of Saskatchewan Youth.



    SKU: 7-018
  • 2-106: Cannabis Use in the Childbearing Years: An Evidence Summary for Healthcare Providers

    Cannabis Use in the Childbearing Years: An Evidence Summary for Healthcare Providers

    Report, 2018


    Due to the legalization of cannabis in Canada, and for the health of children and families, there is a growing need to provide parents, prospective parents, healthcare professionals, and other service providers with evidence-based information about the potential risks of cannabis use. This evidence summary is for healthcare providers. It provides general information about cannabis and rates of cannabis use in Canada, as well as information about the potential risks of cannabis use before, during, and after pregnancy. This summary also offers several recommendations for public messaging based on the available research.

    Report, 2018


    Due to the legalization of cannabis in Canada, and for the health of children and families, there is a growing need to provide parents, prospective parents, healthcare professionals, and other service providers with evidence-based information about the potential risks of cannabis use. This evidence summary is for healthcare providers. It provides general information about cannabis and rates of cannabis use in Canada, as well as information about the potential risks of cannabis use before, during, and after pregnancy. This summary also offers several recommendations for public messaging based on the available research.



    SKU: 2-106
  • 2-448: Gestational Diabetes Risks Prevention and Treatments

    Gestational Diabetes Risks Prevention and Treatments

    Literature Review, 2020


    Gestational diabetes, also known as gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), is a sub-type of diabetes that is first identified during pregnancy. It consists of abnormal glucose tolerance or higher than normal blood glucose levels, that may or may not diminish following the birth of an infant. Over the past decades, GDM rates have continued to increase in Canada. This review provides information on the risk factors for developing GDM, its impact on maternal and offspring health, the approach to screening and diagnosis, recommended management strategies (both pharmacological and non-pharmacological), as well as primary prevention strategies.

    Literature Review, 2020


    Gestational diabetes, also known as gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), is a sub-type of diabetes that is first identified during pregnancy. It consists of abnormal glucose tolerance or higher than normal blood glucose levels, that may or may not diminish following the birth of an infant. Over the past decades, GDM rates have continued to increase in Canada. This review provides information on the risk factors for developing GDM, its impact on maternal and offspring health, the approach to screening and diagnosis, recommended management strategies (both pharmacological and non-pharmacological), as well as primary prevention strategies.



    SKU: 2-448
  • GPC Evidence Summary

    GPC Evidence Summary

    Report, 2016


    Group prenatal care is a model of group where eight to twelve women of similar gestational age meet as a group with their healthcare provider for 90-120 minutes of regularly scheduled appointments, starting in their second trimester and continuing throughout their pregnancy. During these appointments, each woman has a brief individual physical assessment with the healthcare provider and then participates in a group discussion led by a healthcare provider. All prenatal care is provided in this group setting, combining the usual physical assessment with peer support and increased time for education about healthy pregnancy. This report examines current research on group prenatal care to assess if it is a good model of care for Saskatchewan and if there is an improvement in birth outcomes and breastfeeding rates associated with using this model of care compared to individual prenatal care. Birth outcomes examined in this report are gestational age at birth, preterm birth, and low birth weight.

    Report, 2016


    Group prenatal care is a model of group where eight to twelve women of similar gestational age meet as a group with their healthcare provider for 90-120 minutes of regularly scheduled appointments, starting in their second trimester and continuing throughout their pregnancy. During these appointments, each woman has a brief individual physical assessment with the healthcare provider and then participates in a group discussion led by a healthcare provider. All prenatal care is provided in this group setting, combining the usual physical assessment with peer support and increased time for education about healthy pregnancy. This report examines current research on group prenatal care to assess if it is a good model of care for Saskatchewan and if there is an improvement in birth outcomes and breastfeeding rates associated with using this model of care compared to individual prenatal care. Birth outcomes examined in this report are gestational age at birth, preterm birth, and low birth weight.



    SKU: 2-904
  • Group Prenatal Care Lit Review

    Group Prenatal Care Lit Review

    Report, 2016


    Group prenatal care is a model of group where eight to twelve women of similar gestational age meet as a group with their healthcare provider for 90-120 minutes of regularly scheduled appointments, starting in their second trimester and continuing throughout their pregnancy. During these appointments, each woman has a brief individual physical assessment with the healthcare provider and then participates in a group discussion led by a healthcare provider. All prenatal care is provided in this group setting, combining the usual physical assessment with peer support and increased time for education about healthy pregnancy. This report examines current research on group prenatal care to assess if it is a good model of care for Saskatchewan and if there is an improvement in birth outcomes and breastfeeding rates associated with using this model of care compared to individual prenatal care. Birth outcomes examined in this report are gestational age at birth, preterm birth, and low birth weight.

    Report, 2016


    Group prenatal care is a model of group where eight to twelve women of similar gestational age meet as a group with their healthcare provider for 90-120 minutes of regularly scheduled appointments, starting in their second trimester and continuing throughout their pregnancy. During these appointments, each woman has a brief individual physical assessment with the healthcare provider and then participates in a group discussion led by a healthcare provider. All prenatal care is provided in this group setting, combining the usual physical assessment with peer support and increased time for education about healthy pregnancy. This report examines current research on group prenatal care to assess if it is a good model of care for Saskatchewan and if there is an improvement in birth outcomes and breastfeeding rates associated with using this model of care compared to individual prenatal care. Birth outcomes examined in this report are gestational age at birth, preterm birth, and low birth weight.



    SKU: 2-903
  • Infant Mortality in Saskatchewan: Evidence to Inform Public Health Practice

    Infant Mortality in Saskatchewan: Evidence to Inform Public Health Practice

    Report, 2009


    This document was prepared to describe the relationship between modifiable risk factors and infant mortality. It is meant to provide guidance, strategies, and support to help expand or develop programs that may contribute to the reduction of infant mortality in Saskatchewan. It includes a review of the literature regarding prevalent risk factors associated with infant mortality, as well as identifying promising practices related to those modifiable risk factors.

    Report, 2009


    This document was prepared to describe the relationship between modifiable risk factors and infant mortality. It is meant to provide guidance, strategies, and support to help expand or develop programs that may contribute to the reduction of infant mortality in Saskatchewan. It includes a review of the literature regarding prevalent risk factors associated with infant mortality, as well as identifying promising practices related to those modifiable risk factors.



    SKU: 2-457
  • Prenatal eHealth Tools

    Prenatal eHealth Tools

    Report, 2016


    Expectant parents today have access to a wealth of information on pregnancy and childbirth, and much of that information is accessed electronically. Knowledgeable healthcare providers who understand the strengths and limitations of these new technologies are in an excellent position to offer expert guidance to women using these technology-based prenatal health tools. This summary seeks to educate interested stakeholders about eHealth, what it entails, the potential benefits and challenges, and recommended options for using eHealth to provide quality prenatal information to residents of Saskatchewan.

    Report, 2016


    Expectant parents today have access to a wealth of information on pregnancy and childbirth, and much of that information is accessed electronically. Knowledgeable healthcare providers who understand the strengths and limitations of these new technologies are in an excellent position to offer expert guidance to women using these technology-based prenatal health tools. This summary seeks to educate interested stakeholders about eHealth, what it entails, the potential benefits and challenges, and recommended options for using eHealth to provide quality prenatal information to residents of Saskatchewan.



    SKU: 2-902
  • Prenatal eHealth Tools Report

    Prenatal eHealth Tools Report

    Report, 2016


    Expectant parents today have access to a wealth of information on pregnancy and childbirth, and much of that information is accessed electronically. Knowledgeable healthcare providers who understand the strengths and limitations of these new technologies are in an excellent position to offer expert guidance to women using these technology-based prenatal health tools. This report seeks to educate interested stakeholders about eHealth, what it entails, the potential benefits and challenges, and recommended options for using eHealth to provide quality prenatal information to residents of Saskatchewan.

    Report, 2016


    Expectant parents today have access to a wealth of information on pregnancy and childbirth, and much of that information is accessed electronically. Knowledgeable healthcare providers who understand the strengths and limitations of these new technologies are in an excellent position to offer expert guidance to women using these technology-based prenatal health tools. This report seeks to educate interested stakeholders about eHealth, what it entails, the potential benefits and challenges, and recommended options for using eHealth to provide quality prenatal information to residents of Saskatchewan.



    SKU: 2-901
  • Provincial Services for Women Living with HIV Who Have Experienced Violence and Abuse

    Provincial Services for Women Living with HIV Who Have Experienced Violence and Abuse

    Report, 2012


    This document outlines agencies (provincial and national) that provide services for women who have experienced abuse, sexual abuse, and/or have HIV. Descriptions and contact information (phone numbers and websites) are provided.

    Report, 2012


    This document outlines agencies (provincial and national) that provide services for women who have experienced abuse, sexual abuse, and/or have HIV. Descriptions and contact information (phone numbers and websites) are provided.



    SKU: 7-512
  • Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs)

    Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs)

    Report, 2010


    This report presents the results of an environmental scan of available education resources focused on the effects of STIs, and their impact on fertility, pregnancy, and the newborn. Included is a preliminary assessment of the needs of health and allied health professionals in Saskatchewan for resources in this area.

    Report, 2010


    This report presents the results of an environmental scan of available education resources focused on the effects of STIs, and their impact on fertility, pregnancy, and the newborn. Included is a preliminary assessment of the needs of health and allied health professionals in Saskatchewan for resources in this area.



    SKU: 7-502
  • Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs)

    Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs) Executive Summary

    Report, 2011


    This executive summary is for the report “Sexually Transmitted Infections and Their Effects on Fertility, Pregnancy, and the Newborn: An Environmental Scan of Available Resources and a Preliminary Needs Assessment for Saskatchewan Health Care Providers”.

    Report, 2011


    This executive summary is for the report “Sexually Transmitted Infections and Their Effects on Fertility, Pregnancy, and the Newborn: An Environmental Scan of Available Resources and a Preliminary Needs Assessment for Saskatchewan Health Care Providers”.



    SKU: 7-503
  • Substance Use, Pregnancy, and HIV/AIDS: Treatment Programs for Pregnant Women

    Substance Use, Pregnancy, and HIV/AIDS: Treatment Programs for Pregnant Women

    Report, 2012


    This living document identifies existing substance use treatment programs and services available to pregnant women and pregnant women living with HIV/AIDS in North America, with a particular focus on Saskatchewan. The information provided through the current environmental scan is useful both for pregnant women who use substances who are seeking services, and for healthcare professionals, who can use this information to assist women in accessing services that are appropriate to their needs. Ideally, this would be done as part of a multidisciplinary team, where the referring professional continues to be involved in the care of the woman. It is hoped that the information provided will increase awareness of the existing substance use treatment centres and programs for pregnant women, with the goal of potentially increasing referrals to and use of these programs.

    Report, 2012


    This living document identifies existing substance use treatment programs and services available to pregnant women and pregnant women living with HIV/AIDS in North America, with a particular focus on Saskatchewan. The information provided through the current environmental scan is useful both for pregnant women who use substances who are seeking services, and for healthcare professionals, who can use this information to assist women in accessing services that are appropriate to their needs. Ideally, this would be done as part of a multidisciplinary team, where the referring professional continues to be involved in the care of the woman. It is hoped that the information provided will increase awareness of the existing substance use treatment centres and programs for pregnant women, with the goal of potentially increasing referrals to and use of these programs.



    SKU: 7-509
  • The Impact of Substance Use on Mother-to-Child Transmission of HIV

    The Impact of Substance Use on Mother-to-child Transmission of HIV

    Report, 2012


    This literature review aimed to assess the impact of substance use on mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of HIV. Such a review was deemed necessary due to Saskatchewan’s unique HIV profile. Specifically, new cases of HIV in Saskatchewan are: (a) the highest in Canada; (b) most often associated with injection drug use (IDU); and (c) increasing rapidly in women of childbearing age (ages 15 to 39). The primary questions addressed in the report include: Why do substance use services need to be focused on to avoid MTCT of HIV? How does having a substance use issue influence high risk behaviours that can lead to HIV infection? How does having a substance use issue affect virus progression and impact the health of pregnant women living with HIV?

    Report, 2012


    This literature review aimed to assess the impact of substance use on mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of HIV. Such a review was deemed necessary due to Saskatchewan’s unique HIV profile. Specifically, new cases of HIV in Saskatchewan are: (a) the highest in Canada; (b) most often associated with injection drug use (IDU); and (c) increasing rapidly in women of childbearing age (ages 15 to 39). The primary questions addressed in the report include: Why do substance use services need to be focused on to avoid MTCT of HIV? How does having a substance use issue influence high risk behaviours that can lead to HIV infection? How does having a substance use issue affect virus progression and impact the health of pregnant women living with HIV?



    SKU: 7-508
  • 7-303: Tips for Talking With Your Students: How to Build Healthy Relationships, Including Dating Relationships

    Tips for Talking With Your Students: How to Build Healthy Relationships, Including Dating Relationships

    Report, 2018


    Teaching young people how to build healthy relationships provides them with valuable skills that can promote their overall health. This resource is designed for educators and provides tips for educating students about building healthy relationships, including dating relationships.

    Report, 2018


    Teaching young people how to build healthy relationships provides them with valuable skills that can promote their overall health. This resource is designed for educators and provides tips for educating students about building healthy relationships, including dating relationships.



    SKU: 7-303
  • Vertical (Mother-to-child) Transmission of HIV: Prevention, Treatment, and Education

    Vertical (Mother-to-child) Transmission of HIV: Prevention, Treatment, and Education

    Report, 2014


    Saskatchewan continues to see high rates of new cases of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in comparison to the rest of Canada. A large number of these new cases are being identified in women of childbearing age.

    Recognizing the importance of understanding HIV in the context of pregnancy, the Saskatchewan Prevention Institute conducted a review of the literature in this area. The review includes findings and recommendations on vertical transmission, transmission prevention, barriers to prevention, and health promotion around these topics.

    Report, 2014


    Saskatchewan continues to see high rates of new cases of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in comparison to the rest of Canada. A large number of these new cases are being identified in women of childbearing age.

    Recognizing the importance of understanding HIV in the context of pregnancy, the Saskatchewan Prevention Institute conducted a review of the literature in this area. The review includes findings and recommendations on vertical transmission, transmission prevention, barriers to prevention, and health promotion around these topics.



    SKU: 7-501